Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

DEBATE

The Murderous Lure of Jihad: Tackling ISIS and its Worldwide Recruitment (part 2)

Read more

DEBATE

The Murderous Lure of Jihad: Tackling ISIS and its Worldwide Recruitment

Read more

FOCUS

Republicans block Obama's bid to hike minimum wage

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

"Steely resolve of reporters exploited by pared-down employers"

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Cécile Duflot ruffles some feathers

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

US judge calls Argentina bond swap offer illegal

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Media accused of pro-protester bias in Ferguson

Read more

WEB NEWS

Calls for ISIS media blackout after execution of James Foley

Read more

WEB NEWS

Web users divided over Darren Wilson

Read more

  • Fear of Ebola sky-high among Air France workers

    Read more

  • US says Islamic State threat 'beyond anything we've seen'

    Read more

  • Malaysia mourns as remains of MH17 victims arrive home

    Read more

  • Hollande is ‘nobody’s president’ says former French minister

    Read more

  • Reporter’s IS captors taunted family, asked for €100m ransom

    Read more

  • Two US Ebola patients leave hospital ‘virus-free’

    Read more

  • Turkey’s Erdogan names foreign minister Davutoglu as next PM

    Read more

  • US reaches historic $16.7bn settlement with Bank of America

    Read more

  • Special report: Supplying Ukraine’s soldiers on the front line

    Read more

  • Israeli air strike kills three top Hamas commanders

    Read more

  • France delivered arms to Syrian rebels, Hollande confirms

    Read more

  • Tensions high in Yemen as Shiite rebel deadline looms

    Read more

  • Interactive: Relive the Liberation of Paris in WWII

    Read more

  • French village rallies behind besieged elderly British couple

    Read more

  • Former Irish PM Albert Reynolds dies at 81

    Read more

  • Former Femen activist detained after fighting veiled woman

    Read more

Asia-pacific

Death toll mounts in uprising against Kyrgyz President

Video by Lorna SHADDICK , Jade BARKER

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2010-04-07

Clashes between opposition and police Wednesday resulted in dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries. The opposition are protesting against President Bakiyev, who they accuse of authoritarianism. The interior minister may be among the victims.

REUTERS - Kyrgyz troops opened fire on anti-government protesters on Wednesday outside the offices where President Kurmanbek Bakiyev was sheltering from clashes that have killed dozens of people, a Reuters witness said.

A group of at least 10 government soldiers were shooting with automatic weapons from the government headquarters towards demonstrators, a Reuters cameraman said.

But a group of protesters, waving red-and-yellow Kyrgyz flags, arrived in the main square on an armoured personnel carrier seized from the military.

UNCERTAINTY OVER INTERIOR MINISTER KONGANTIYEV'S FATE (AFP)

A police source said Interior Minister Moldomus Kongantiyev had been killed in the northwest hub of Talas where the first protests erupted.
  
Kongantiyev was attacked by protestors who had also taken deputy prime minister Akylbek Zhaparov captive, the Kabar Kyrgyz state news agency reported.
  
An interior ministry spokesman, Rakhmatullo Akhmedov, later said Kongantiyev was alive but acknowledged the government had little information on the situation in Talas, saying it was "checking" reports the minister was taken hostage.

Huge plumes of black smoke were billowing around the centre of Bishkek, the capital of the impoverished Central Asian state of 5.3 million people. There was intense gunfire in the centre of Bishkek and a series of blasts. Protesters were dragging wounded people covered in blood away from the square.

"There are dozens of dead bodies, all with gunshot wounds," Akylbek Yeukebayev, a doctor at a Bishkek hospital told Reuters.

Ex-Soviet Kyrgyzstan hosts a U.S. military air base that helps support troops in Afghanistan, as well as a Russian base.

Kyrgyz Prime Minister Daniyar Usenov, who earlier dismissed the protesters in Talas as "bandits", told Reuters by telephone that he and the president were both working in their offices. "We daren't even look out of the window," Kamil Sydykov, the prime minister's spokesman, said by telephone from inside the presidential building.

Some 1,000 people stormed the prosecutor-general's office in the capital and were breaking windows and tossing out computers and office equipment, a Reuters reporter said. Opposition activists also took control of state television channel KTR.

"The political violence is likely to continue in Kyrgyzstan," said Lilit Gevorgyan, political analyst at IHS Global Insight. "Given (Bakiyev's) resolve in recent years to concentrate power in his hands only, it is difficult to see how a political compromise may be found."

Kyrgyzstan receives aid from both Russia and the United States as well as from neighbouring China. Bishkek also relies on remittances from migrant workers in Russia; payments that have dwindled in the last year as Russia's economy has suffered.

"The country still has an inherent vulnerability which in an environment of economic dislocation can easily be sparked off into a new cycle of violence," said Christopher Granville of Trusted Sources Research in London.

"The drop in remittances is a very important part of the explanation for the latest civic violence," he said.

Unrest spreads

Protesters seized government buildings in three other towns. In one town, Talas, Kyrgyz First Deputy Prime Minister Aklybek Japarov and Interior Minister Moldomusa Kongantiyev were badly beaten. Kongantiyev was forced to shout: "Down with Bakiyev!", two witnesses said.

The opposition in Kyrgyzstan has been demanding that Bakiyev, who himself came to power in a popular revolt in 2005, tackle corruption and fire his relatives from senior positions.

Russia called for restraint. "We would like to make an urgent appeal to the hostile parties to refrain from the use of force to avoid bloodshed," Andrei Nesterenko, spokesman for Russia's Foreign Ministry, said in a statement.

The Kyrgyz government declared a state of emergency and said a curfew would be enforced between 8:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. in Bishkek and three other regions of Kyrgyzstan.

Bakiyev, from the south of Kyrgyzstan, has angered clans from Bishkek, Talas and other regions by appointing in his own kinsmen to senior positions, and excluding others from power, said Reinhard Krumm, director of a Moscow think-tank.

The protests spread to the capital after riots which began in Talas the day before and continued into Wednesday.

"We will stay here until the end, no matter what the government does," Talas Kadyraliyev, a 45-year-old local opposition activist, told Reuters from the scene.

In Naryn, a town in central Kyrgyzstan, more than 1,000 opponents of the president also took over the local government building, witnesses told Reuters. The government headquarters in a southern village, Kerben, were also occupied by protesters.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon visited Bishkek last week and called on the government to do more to protect human rights. Ban was shocked at the loss of life in Kyrgyzstan on Wednesday.

"The Secretary General is shocked by the reported deaths and injuries that have occurred today in Kyrgyzstan. He urgently appeals for dialogue and calm to avoid further bloodshed," Ban's spokesman, Martin Nesirky, said during a transit stop in Moscow.

Date created : 2010-04-07

COMMENT(S)