Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

INSIDE THE AMERICAS

Indigenous peoples: Fighting discrimination

Read more

MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

From Turkey to Iran: (re)inventing kebab

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara: ‘Dinosaurs were the last great champions’

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Alan Turing's nephew: ‘A Shakespearean tragedy surrounded his life’

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Zimbabwe: Chamisa's lawyers contest election results in court

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

New US sanctions on Iran: Trump ups pressure after exiting nuclear deal

Read more

IN THE PRESS

‘Space Farce’? Alternative logos for new US military branch flood social media

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Zambia accused of illegal handover of Zimbabwean opposition figure

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

#MyCameraIsMyWeapon campaign takes on Iran's mandatory hijab law

Read more

Sports

Vinokourov wins oldest one-day classic race

Text by NEWS WIRES

Latest update : 2010-04-25

For the second time in his long career, 36-year-old Kazakhstan's Alexandre Vinokourov (Astana) has won the Liege-Bastogne-Liege race, the oldest one-day classic.

AFP - Kazakhstan's Alexandre Vinokourov, of Astana stunned a host of bigger favourites to win Liege-Bastogne-Liege, cycling's oldest one-day classic, for the second time Sunday.

Vinokourov, the winner in 2005 who returned to the sport last year after a two-year ban for doping, crossed the finish line just ahead of fellow escapee Alexandre Kolobnev to finish in a little over six and a half hours.

Russia's Kolobnev, of Katusha, finished second with Spain's former two-time winner Alejandro Valverde, of Caisse d'Epargne, finishing third.

"I've turned the page," claimed Vinokourov, who was kicked off the 2007 Tour de France for blood doping after a second stage victory, prompting his team Astana to pull out of the race.

The Kazakh, who has always proclaimed his innocence, added: "I've returned stronger than before and I've shown everybody that 'Vino' is back.

"This team was created for and also thanks to me. I've completed my punishment so I don't see why I shouldn't come back."

Vinokourov came into the race in good shape having just won the Tour of Trentino in Italy.

And when he escaped alongside the ever-impressive Kolobnev in the final 15 km of the race it looked like they had the race sewn up.

Together they opened up a crucial 30-sec lead on the chasing trio of Cadel Evans, Philippe Gilbert and Valverde.

Gilbert, who lives near one of the race's most difficult climbs, La Redoute, then counter-attacked Valverde on the 10th and last classified climb at Saint Nicolas and gave it his all in a bid to close the gap.

Vinokourov and Kolobnev's gap only increased, however -- perhaps as a result of Vinokourov being condemned to attack due to having appeared to have lost radio contact with the team car that would normally inform him of time gaps.

On the final climb into Ans, a suburb of Liege where the race finishes, Gilbert was rejoined by Valverde and Evans and despite taking the Spaniard's wheel the Belgian finished off the podium.

Date created : 2010-04-25

COMMENT(S)