Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

TALKING EUROPE

Europe's 'soft power': EU Commissioner Tibor Navracsics on European identity

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

Goodbye to tax havens? New EU blacklist under the microscope

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Triumph for French women's handball team: All hail 'The Fighters'

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

France's Macron criticised for 'living like a king'

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Power restored at world's busiest airport

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

‘Mexico will not finance US wall,’ foreign minister says

Read more

ACROSS AFRICA

AU: African nations must prepare for potential return of thousands of jihadists

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

DR Congo former child soldiers awarded $10 million in damages in landmark ruling

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Website roots out 'Rotten Apples'

Read more

France

Quadriplegic Frenchman successfully swims English Channel

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2010-09-19

A Frenchman who lost his limbs in a 1994 electrical accident successfully swam across the English Channel on Saturday. Philippe Croizon, 42, arrived on the French coast in Calais just before 9:30 pm.

AFP - A Frenchman who lost all his limbs in an electrical accident successfully swam across the Channel on Saturday, a challenge he has been preparing for two years, his support team said.
   
Philippe Croizon, 42, set off from Folkestone in southern England just before 8:00 am (0600 GMT) and arrived on the French coast just before 9:30 pm (0730 GMT), propelled by his specially designed flipper-shaped prosthetic legs.
   
According to an official, Croizon landed on a rock at the bottom of a cliff near the Wissant coast in Calais and his support team said he immediately boarded a boat heading to Britain.
   
Steadying himself with the stumps of his arms, he was advancing at a constant speed in good weather, his support team said, adding that he was in good form and had been accompanied by dolphins for part of the crossing.
   
Croizon swims at around three kilometres (two miles) per hour, slightly slower than the four or five kilometres per hour that an able-bodied athlete might achieve.
   
In 1994 the metalworker was hit by a 20,000 volt charge as he attempted to remove a television aerial from a house roof and an arc of current surged through him from a nearby powerline.
   
Doctors were forced to amputate his limbs. As he recovered in hospital he saw a television documentary about a Channel swimmer and an ambition was born.
   
The father of two said he wanted to complete the dare "for myself, my family and all my fellows in misfortune who have lost their taste for life".
   
Croizon trained for his feat for two years and last month completed a 12-hour swim between the ports of Noirmoutier and Pornic on France's Atlantic coast.
 

Date created : 2010-09-18

COMMENT(S)