Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

IN THE PAPERS

Was the UN chief’s speech in Tel Aviv really a 'shameful message'?

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

France concerned about anti-Semitism

Read more

WEB NEWS

Online movement demands peace in Gaza

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Apple aims to satisfy China's hunger for smartphones

Read more

DEBATE

MH17: Punishing Putin? (part two)

Read more

DEBATE

MH17: Punishing Putin?

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Competing narratives in Malaysia Airlines disaster coverage

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Kenya : Police arrest 8 over Mombasa rampage

Read more

FOCUS

Overfishing and the global appetite for bluefin tuna: can Tokyo turn the tide?

Read more

  • Paris braced for new pro-Palestinian rally after clashes

    Read more

  • Video: Fear, death and mourning in Gaza’s Khan Younis

    Read more

  • Young riders raise French hopes for Tour de France

    Read more

  • Defying UK, France to proceed with warships sale to Russia

    Read more

  • Kerry arrives in Israel to push for Gaza ceasefire

    Read more

  • Netherlands to honour MH17 victims in national day of mourning

    Read more

  • US courts issue conflicting reports on Obamacare

    Read more

  • Video: Lebanon fears fallout from regional turmoil

    Read more

  • Widodo wins Indonesian presidential election

    Read more

  • Flight MH17 shot down ‘by mistake', US intelligence indicates

    Read more

  • US, European airlines suspend flights to Tel Aviv

    Read more

  • Australian veteran Rogers claims 16th stage of Tour de France

    Read more

  • France gives go-ahead to pro-Palestinian Paris rally

    Read more

  • French Jews mourn French-Israeli soldier killed in Gaza

    Read more

  • PSG punished by UEFA for abuse of disabled Chelsea fans

    Read more

France

Fuel supply will take 'several days' to return to normal

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2010-10-22

It will take "several days" to restore fuel supplies to normal at French petrol stations, the premier's office said Friday, although Transport Minister Jean-Louis Borloo (pictured) said there were no plans to begin rationing fuel.

AFP - Emergency measures to restore fuel supplies to French forecourts will take "several days" to return the situation to normal, amid ongoing strike action, the prime minister's office said Friday.
   
"At a time when many French people wish to travel for the November 1 holiday weekend, it is in everyone's interest to make all necessary efforts to return the situation to normal, which will take several more days," said a statement from Prime Minister Francois Fillon's office.
   
Transport Minister Jean-Louis Borloo said the government has no immediate plans to introduce fuel rationing, despite shortages caused by strikes by workers defending their right to retire at 60.
   
Petroleum traders' association UFIP said after crisis talks with the government that the resupply of strike-hit French filling stations will take longer than planned with motorway stations a priority.
   
"There will be a particular effort made for motorway stations ahead of the holiday travel period" during the 12-day break starting when schools break up Friday, said UFIP president Jean-Louis Schilanksy.
   
For two months France has been in the grip of a wave of protests against President Nicolas Sarkozy's bid to raise the retirement age from 60 to 62 and to set the latest threshold for full pension payments at 67.
   
Over the past 11 days France's 12 oil refineries have been disrupted by strikes, and on Friday around one in five filling stations had run out of fuel, Borloo told reporters.
   
The Senate was due to vote on Sarkozy's pensions reform bill later in the day, and it could be formally adopted into law as early as next week.

Date created : 2010-10-22

  • FRANCE

    Police break fuel blockade as key pension vote looms

    Read more

  • FRANCE

    Unions call for new strikes to protest pension reform

    Read more

  • FRANCE

    New clashes erupt between youths, police amid pension protests

    Read more

COMMENT(S)