Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - 18 April 2014

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - 18 April 2014 (part 2)

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Presidential adviser resigns over "shoe-shine scandal"

Read more

#THE 51%

Breaking stereotypes

Read more

#TECH 24

Galaxy S5 v. HTC One (M8): Which is the right one for you?

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

New PM Manuel Valls outlines priorities

Read more

FASHION

Jean-Marc Loubier, bags and shoes.

Read more

ENCORE!

Hip-hop musician Beat Assailant on mixing the sounds of the city

Read more

REVISITED

In Prijedor, survivors fight to keep memory alive

Read more

  • Algeria's ailing Bouteflika clinches fourth term amid fraud claims

    Read more

  • Does Valls’ upcoming Vatican trip violate French secularism?

    Read more

  • Ukraine separatists say ‘not bound’ by Geneva deal

    Read more

  • Abel Ferrara’s hotly awaited DSK film to premiere on web

    Read more

  • World honours Garcia Marquez’s magical literary legacy

    Read more

  • Analysis Ukraine: ‘One bloody incident could scupper Geneva deal’

    Read more

  • Top Hollande adviser resigns over conflict of interest accusation

    Read more

  • Police seek arrest warrant for South Korea ferry captain

    Read more

  • Indian election: Votes for sale

    Read more

  • West African Ebola outbreak caused by new strain of virus

    Read more

  • Astronomers discover Earth-like planet that could support life

    Read more

  • Video: Tensions remain high in Mariupol despite Geneva deal

    Read more

  • In Prijedor, survivors fight to keep memory alive

    Read more

  • Deadly avalanche strikes Everest in worst-ever disaster

    Read more

  • With a strong French presence, veterans and fresh faces, Cannes aims to please

    Read more

  • Russia and West agree on steps to ease Ukraine crisis

    Read more

  • Mob launches deadly attack on UN shelter for S. Sudan civilians

    Read more

  • Eurostar train mishap causes 'severe' delays

    Read more

  • Chelsea Clinton announces she's pregnant

    Read more

  • French troops free five aid workers kidnapped in Mali by Islamists

    Read more

  • In pictures: Iranian woman pardons son’s killer at the gallows

    Read more

  • After cup defeat, Spanish pundits read last rites for Barcelona

    Read more

  • India heads to polls in single largest day of voting

    Read more

  • Ukraine talks open in Geneva as Putin talks tough on TV

    Read more

  • Pro-Russian separatists killed in attack on Black Sea base

    Read more

Asia-pacific

Scores of assumed tsunami victims found alive

©

Video by Gaëlle Faure

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2010-10-30

Rescuers searching for survivors of the devastating tsunami that hit Indonesia earlier this week have found some 135 people - previously thought to have been killed - on the remote island of Mentawai.

AFP - Scores of people feared dead in Indonesia's tsunami disaster zone were found alive Saturday as rescue workers spread out to remote island communities five days after the killer wave.

The discovery came as Indonesia struggled with disaster on two fronts following another powerful eruption of the archipelago's most active volcano, which spread chaos and ash over a vast area of central Java.
  
On the tsunami-hit Mentawai island chain off the coast of Sumatra, rescue workers battling rough seas and monsoon rain found 135 people hiding on high ground, too scared of another wave to return to their shattered villages.
  
"We're so grateful that we've found many of the missing people -- we'd been working very hard to find them," disaster management official Joskamatir said.
  
Officials had held little hope of finding many of the missing after flights over the area earlier in the week revealed dozens of unclaimed bodies strewn across beaches and wedged in rubble.
  
Many of the dead were also believed to have been sucked out to sea as the killer wave receded.
  
The number of missing was almost halved from 298 to 163 following Saturday's discovery, while the death count remained at 413, according to an official tally.
  
Rescue workers were reaching some of the isolated coastal villages crushed by the three-metre (10-foot) wall of water which was triggered on Monday by a 7.7-magnitude earthquake, but monsoon weather was slowing the relief effort.
  
"Before help came I survived by eating whatever we could find, such as taro," said Theopilus, 42, a farmer on the worst-hit island of South Pagai.
  
"We're in dire need of more food, tents and blankets. I feel really cold at night as it rains all the time."
  
In central Java, 1,300 kilometres (810 miles) to the southeast, terrified residents fled in panic when Mount Merapi erupted again just after midnight, fearing a repeat of explosions on Tuesday that claimed at least 36 lives.
  
No one was killed in the latest eruption, but hospital staff reported that two people had died in the chaotic rush to escape.
  
"I was sleeping on the veranda when loud booms like thunder woke me up," local resident Kris Budianto, 51, told AFP. He suffered a broken arm and facial wounds when he crashed his motorbike in the melee.
  
Volcanic ash rained down on the Central Java provincial capital of Yogyakarta 26 kilometres away from the crater, shutting the airport for over an hour.
  
Government volcanologist Subandrio said more eruptions were likely and warned about 50,000 people who have been evacuated from the danger zone not to tempt fate by going home too soon.
  
"We will even have to evaluate whether we need to widen the exclusion zone because we should not downplay the threat -- Mount Merapi is extremely dangerous," he said.
  
Many displaced people return to the slopes of 2,914-metre Merapi, a sacred landmark in Javanese tradition whose name means "Mountain of Fire", to tend to their precious livestock during the day.
  
On North Pagai, dazed and hungry survivors of Monday night's tsunami were still roaming between devastated villages looking for food and lost loved ones.
  
A baby was born in a crammed medical clinic as a man died of his wounds just a few beds away.
  
Another ship bearing badly need supplies such as tents, medicine and food arrived at Sikakap on the protected side of North Pagai island, while helicopters dropped aid packages to cut-off villages.
  
Joskamatir said only five percent of the aid piling up at Sikakap had been delivered to those in need, citing bad weather and the "limited availability of transportation" such as boats and helicopters.
  
"There are three helicopters here already but we still need more speedboats. We need about 50 speedboats," he said.
  
Australia and the United States have pledged aid worth a total of three million dollars while the European Commission released 1.5 million euros (two million dollars) for victims of both disasters.
  
Indonesia straddles a region known as the "Pacific Ring of Fire", with scores of active volcanoes and major tectonic fault lines. Almost 170,000 Indonesians were killed in the 2004 Asian tsunami.
  
President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono visited tsunami survivors on Thursday and said the "only long-term solution" was for people to move away from the most vulnerable coastal areas.
  
Mentawai fisherman Hari, 24, agreed.
  
"I plan to leave my village. I don't want to live here anymore. I'm traumatised," he said.

Date created : 2010-10-30

  • INDONESIA

    Indonesia's Mount Merapi volcano erupts again

    Read more

  • INDONESIA

    Death toll surpasses 100 in Indonesian tsunami

    Read more

Comments

COMMENT(S)