Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

'New York Post' slammed for publishing ISIS execution images

Read more

DEBATE

Back to Square One?

Read more

DEBATE

Israel-Gaza: Back to Square One?

Read more

DEBATE

Israel-Gaza conflict: 72-hour ceasefire deal sets stage for Cairo talks

Read more

WEB NEWS

Web users divided over Darren Wilson

Read more

FOCUS

Spain's El Hierro to become world's first self-powered island

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

A bellwether for what not to do

Read more

ENCORE!

Luc Besson back in action with Scarlett Johansson in 'Lucy'

Read more

FOCUS

Israel's minorities and military service

Read more

  • US forces tried to rescue slain reporter from IS captors

    Read more

  • Interactive: Relive the Liberation of Paris in WWII

    Read more

  • US attorney general visits Missouri town after fatal shooting

    Read more

  • French village rallies behind besieged elderly British couple

    Read more

  • Brutal IS beheading video sparks social media pushback

    Read more

  • Netanyahu compares Hamas to IS, Gaza offensive to continue

    Read more

  • France’s ex-PM Juppé sets up presidential clash with Sarkozy

    Read more

  • France’s Hollande says global security ‘worst since 2001’

    Read more

  • France urges Iran, others in region, to join fight against IS

    Read more

  • A new view on Normandy landings, 70 years on

    Read more

  • Dozens killed as landslides strike Japan’s Hiroshima

    Read more

  • Suspected Ebola cases in Austria, new drug raises hopes

    Read more

  • WWII anniversary highlights best - and worst - of Paris police

    Read more

  • Headscarf at the beach sparks French MEP’s fury

    Read more

  • Video: Life in under-siege Donetsk

    Read more

France

Constitutional court clears way to sign pension reform into law

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2010-11-09

France’s Constitutional Court approved a final version of a controversial pension reform Tuesday, giving President Nicolas Sarkozy 15 days to sign it into law. Millions have protested the bill, which will raise the age of retirement from 60 to 62.

 

REUTERS - France's Constitutional Council approved President Nicolas Sarkozy's pension bill on Tuesday, clearing the last hurdle to a reform that will raise the retirement age by two years to stem a huge pension deficit.
 
Despite a late challenge by the opposition Socialist party, the council ruled that the proposed pension law does not breach constitutional rules. It is likely to be signed into law by Sarkozy in the next few days.
 
Fierce opposition by trade unions and the French public, who staged the most sustained of a wave of protests in Europe against austerity measures, turned the pension reform into the biggest battle of Sarkozy's presidency.
 
Long-running port and refinery strikes that badly disrupted fuel supplies failed to stop parliament passing the pension bill last month, in a victory for the conservative president as he tries to reassure financial markets that France can tackle its public deficit.
 
Sarkozy's popularity ratings are at rock-bottom 18 months ahead of a presidential election, but pushing through a reform of the pension system where other governments gave in to unions has bolstered his standing within his centre-right UMP party.
 
Turnout has flagged at recent street marches against the reform, which will gradually raise the minimum and fully pensionable retirement ages by two years to 62 and 67 respectively.
 
France's main trade unions agreed late on Monday to call for a day of localised action on November 23 against the reform that could include small-scale work stoppages and workplace meetings, but their meeting made clear that momentum for large-scale nationwide protests over the pension law has waned.

 

Date created : 2010-11-09

  • FRANCE

    French unions call new pension protests

    Read more

  • FRANCE

    Anti-reform activists push on despite waning support

    Read more

  • FRANCE

    Workers vote to end pension strikes at oil refineries

    Read more

COMMENT(S)