Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE DEBATE

It's all about Trump: how effective will the Democratic Party campaign be?

Read more

FOCUS

Indian women on frontline of battle against alcohol

Read more

FRENCH CONNECTIONS

35 hours: Are French workers lazy?

Read more

INSIDE THE AMERICAS

Race to the White House: Hillary Clinton's popularity problem

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

HRW chief Kenneth Roth: 'Putin cares about European public opinion'

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Facebook profits soar 186% as user numbers surge

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Turkey: 'Once upon a time, there was a democracy'

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Priest attack: 'After the shock, now come the questions'

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

DR Congo: Thousands welcome opposition leader Tshisekedi after two-year absence

Read more

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time. And you can watch it online as early as Friday.

REPORTERS

REPORTERS

Latest update : 2011-01-04

The new Irish exodus

Thousands of young Irish people have already packed their bags and left. Many thousands more are set to join them soon. The small country once labelled the 'Celtic Tiger' is experiencing a wave of emigration on a scale not seen for decades. Amid economic meltdown, many people feel there’s simply no future for them in Ireland.

Throughout history, the country has seen departures en masse before: in the 1840s, following the Second World War, and again in the 1980s. Now fears are mounting that another generation of Irish youth is on the move. But this time, many are heading further afield than ever before. Australia is the number one destination for Irish emigrants, followed by New Zealand and Canada. Worryingly, the majority of those leaving are highly qualified young professionals and graduates; in the past it’s tended to be manual or low-skilled workers who’ve headed abroad. Student leaders speak openly of a looming 'brain drain'.

In and around the Dublin area, it’s not hard to find the reasons why some of the country’s brightest brains are heading abroad. Faced with abandoned building sites and 'for sale' signs at every turn, Ireland’s once-booming property sector has all but collapsed. Hundreds of thousands of people are trapped in negative equity or living in so-called ghost estates, full of empty houses. Ireland’s unemployment rate has been hovering around 14 percent, and living costs remain high. Few people speak of a bright future for Ireland, in the short term, at least.

By Sylvain ROUSSEAU , Catherine NORRIS TRENT

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2016-07-08 history

Video: The trial of Chad's ex-dictator Habré, an inconvenient ally

In May, former Chadian president Hissène Habré, who ruled his country with an iron fist between 1982 and 1990, was sentenced to life in prison for "crimes against humanity,...

Read more

2016-07-01 agriculture

Video: FRANCE 24 speaks to French farmers in crisis

France is the EU's largest agricultural producer, but its farmers are faced with administrative constraints, falling sales prices and debt. Many are pushed into depression and...

Read more

2016-06-23 World War I

World War I: When northern France was on German time

During World War I, thirteen of France's regional departments were under German occupation. For four years, two million French citizens took their orders from Berlin. No more...

Read more

2016-06-17 USA

Video: American conservatives strike back

Some southern US lawmakers have launched a legislative offensive to protect the "religious freedom" they believe is under threat. In Mississippi, homosexuals can now be denied...

Read more

2016-06-09 Iran

Video: A year of change for Iran since nuclear accord

It’s now been a year since Iran struck its historic nuclear accord with six world powers under which Tehran vowed to curb its nuclear programme in exchange for the lifting of...

Read more