Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

DEBATE

Gaza: A Truce At All Costs?

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Central African Republic: Brazzaville ceasefire talks deliver fragile deal

Read more

FOCUS

Sluggish tourist season in Crimea

Read more

ENCORE!

Bartabas : Mixing Christ with Spanish music and dancing horses

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Shifts in the propaganda war waged between Israelis and Palestinians

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

French MPs face quandary in pro-Palestinian rallies

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Yezid Sayigh, Senior Associate at the Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut

Read more

#TECH 24

Mind the Gender Gap : getting more women into the tech sector

Read more

INSIDE THE AMERICAS

Bolivian children: heading to work aged 10

Read more

  • Air Algérie crash site located, France sending military unit

    Read more

  • Air Algérie crash: 'We should eliminate the missile hypothesis'

    Read more

  • Deadly strike on UN shelter in Gaza Strip

    Read more

  • Pope meets with Sudanese Christian woman sentenced to death for apostasy

    Read more

  • Italy’s Nibali cruises to easy victory in 18th stage of Tour de France

    Read more

  • Iraqi parliament elects moderate Kurd as president

    Read more

  • US, European aviation agencies lift travel restrictions to Tel Aviv

    Read more

  • No end to fighting until Israel ends Gaza blockade, Hamas says

    Read more

  • Two foreign women shot dead in western Afghanistan

    Read more

  • At least 60 killed in attack on prison convoy near Baghdad

    Read more

  • Cycling is ‘winning the war on doping,’ says expert

    Read more

  • Ceasefire agreed for Central African Republic

    Read more

  • Can Jew-kissing-Arab selfie give peace a viral chance?

    Read more

  • Botched Arizona execution takes nearly two hours

    Read more

Europe

Blair says he promised Bush support on Iraq a year before invasion

Video by Carla WESTERHEIDE

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2011-01-22

Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair told an inquiry into the Iraq War Friday that he had promised then US President George W. Bush support a year before troops were sent in, also suggesting he ignored top legal advice over the 2003 invasion.

REUTERS - Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair promised he would back the United States in taking action against Saddam Hussein almost a year before the 2003 invasion of Iraq, he told an inquiry on Friday.

While Blair stopped short of saying he had promised U.S. President George W. Bush unconditional military support in early 2002 as critics claim, he said he had always agreed that Saddam had to be dealt with. "I accept entirely I was going to be with America in handling this," he told the London inquiry into Britain's role in the Iraq War, describing conversations between himself and Bush in summer 2002.

"What I was saying to President Bush was very clear and simple, you can count on us, we are going to be with you in tackling this. But there are difficulties."

The timing of the decision for military action is an important issue for opponents of the war, who accuse Blair and Bush of being set on invasion regardless of its legality or whether it had backing from the United Nations.

Blair, who sent 45,000 British troops as part of the U.S.-led invasion in March 2003, was making his second appearance at the British inquiry after being recalled to clarify evidence he gave at a hearing in January last year.

He repeated his message from his first appearance that the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks had changed the calculus of risk, meaning they had to deal with Saddam as he posed a threat to the world and was refusing to comply with the United Nations.

Facing a far more forensic probe of decisions he had taken, Blair said regime change in Iraq was on the cards immediately after the Sept. 11 attacks unless Saddam changed tack.

"If it became the only way to deal with this issue then we were going to be up for it," he said, adding he had persuaded Bush to seek U.N. backing.

A statement he gave to the inquiry also revealed he had ignored advice from the government's top lawyer, given in January 2003 warning an invasion of Iraq would be illegal without a specific U.N. resolution.

Attorney General Peter Goldsmith only changed his mind shortly before the invasion, and Blair said he viewed the earlier advice as "provisional" and believed it would change when Goldsmith became aware of the U.N. negotiations.

The decision to go to war was one of the most controversial episodes of Blair's 10-year premiership which ended in 2007, leading to massive protests and accusations he had deliberately misled the public over the reasons for the invasion.

Alistair Campbell, Blair's former communications chief and one of his closest advisers until he resigned in late 2003, said people still felt raw about the war.

"Some people who actually really liked Tony Blair when he became prime minister ... they will never forgive him for Iraq," he told Sky News.
The inquiry, which began in Nov. 2009 and is headed by former civil servant John Chilcot, was set up by Blair's successor Gordon Brown to learn lessons from the conflict and is not designed to assign guilt or blame to any individual.

Hostility over Iraq continues to dog Blair, 57, now an envoy for the Quartet of Middle East peacemakers -- the United States, Russia, the EU and the United Nations.

About 50 anti-war protesters demonstrated outside the inquiry's venue near parliament in central London, chanting "Blair lies, thousands die".

"He was a liar. What I'm hoping for today is some repentance," said Roy Vickery, 63, a retired botanist. Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair promised he would back the United States in taking action against Saddam Hussein almost a year before the 2003 invasion of Iraq, he told an inquiry on Friday.

While Blair stopped short of saying he had promised U.S. President George W. Bush unconditional military support in early 2002 as critics claim, he said he had always agreed that Saddam had to be dealt with. "I accept entirely I was going to be with America in handling this," he told the London inquiry into Britain's role in the Iraq War, describing conversations between himself and Bush in summer 2002.

"What I was saying to President Bush was very clear and simple, you can count on us, we are going to be with you in tackling this. But there are difficulties."

The timing of the decision for military action is an important issue for opponents of the war, who accuse Blair and Bush of being set on invasion regardless of its legality or whether it had backing from the United Nations.

Blair, who sent 45,000 British troops as part of the U.S.-led invasion in March 2003, was making his second appearance at the British inquiry after being recalled to clarify evidence he gave at a hearing in January last year.

He repeated his message from his first appearance that the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks had changed the calculus of risk, meaning they had to deal with Saddam as he posed a threat to the world and was refusing to comply with the United Nations.

Facing a far more forensic probe of decisions he had taken, Blair said regime change in Iraq was on the cards immediately after the Sept. 11 attacks unless Saddam changed tack.

"If it became the only way to deal with this issue then we were going to be up for it," he said, adding he had persuaded Bush to seek U.N. backing.

A statement he gave to the inquiry also revealed he had ignored advice from the government's top lawyer, given in January 2003 warning an invasion of Iraq would be illegal without a specific U.N. resolution.

Attorney General Peter Goldsmith only changed his mind shortly before the invasion, and Blair said he viewed the earlier advice as "provisional" and believed it would change when Goldsmith became aware of the U.N. negotiations.

The decision to go to war was one of the most controversial episodes of Blair's 10-year premiership which ended in 2007, leading to massive protests and accusations he had deliberately misled the public over the reasons for the invasion.

Alistair Campbell, Blair's former communications chief and one of his closest advisers until he resigned in late 2003, said people still felt raw about the war.

"Some people who actually really liked Tony Blair when he became prime minister ... they will never forgive him for Iraq," he told Sky News.
The inquiry, which began in Nov. 2009 and is headed by former civil servant John Chilcot, was set up by Blair's successor Gordon Brown to learn lessons from the conflict and is not designed to assign guilt or blame to any individual.

Hostility over Iraq continues to dog Blair, 57, now an envoy for the Quartet of Middle East peacemakers -- the United States, Russia, the EU and the United Nations.

About 50 anti-war protesters demonstrated outside the inquiry's venue near parliament in central London, chanting "Blair lies, thousands die".

"He was a liar. What I'm hoping for today is some repentance," said Roy Vickery, 63, a retired botanist.

Date created : 2011-01-21

  • IRELAND

    Protestors throw eggs at Tony Blair during Dublin book signing

    Read more

  • UNITED KINGDOM

    Blair 'sorry' for Iraq victims, but no regrets in memoir

    Read more

  • IRAQ

    Tony Blair faces public grilling over 2003 Iraq invasion

    Read more

COMMENT(S)