Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

AFRICA NEWS

Rwandan singer amongst terror plot suspects

Read more

DEBATE

What's Putin's Plan? Kiev Accuses Russia of Terrorism

Read more

FOCUS

Campaigning against Bouteflika's re-election... in France

Read more

WEB NEWS

Chile: Online mobilization to help Valparaiso fire victims

Read more

ENCORE!

Art, sex, money, memory and manga

Read more

MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Spat over Iran's UN ambassador hampers thawing relations with US

Read more

FOCUS

China trade deal: Is Taiwan's identity under threat?

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

'Call it a caretaker government'

Read more

DEBATE

Nigeria's Battles

Read more

  • Frantic search for South Korea ferry passengers continues

    Read more

  • Kiev powerless as pro-Russia activists seize armoured vehicles

    Read more

  • Scandal-hit French doctor Jacques Servier dies

    Read more

  • US rolls out red carpet for French critic of capitalism

    Read more

  • Real Madrid beat old foes Barcelona to lift Copa del Rey

    Read more

  • Algeria heads to the polls: ‘this election has nothing to do with us’

    Read more

  • Belgian head of wildlife reserve shot in eastern Congo

    Read more

  • France's new PM targets welfare in drive to cut spending

    Read more

  • N. Korea not amused by London hair salon's Kim Jong-un ad

    Read more

  • Campaigning against Bouteflika's re-election... in France

    Read more

  • Brazil club Mineiro cancel Anelka signing after no-show

    Read more

  • Syria 'torture' photos silence UN Security Council members

    Read more

  • Paris laboratory loses deadly SARS virus samples

    Read more

  • More than 100 schoolgirls kidnapped in northeast Nigeria

    Read more

  • New York police disband unit targeting Muslims

    Read more

  • 'Miracle girl' healthy after seven-organ transplant in Paris

    Read more

  • Paris police memo calling for Roma eviction ‘rectified’

    Read more

  • Burgundy digs into France's bureaucratic 'mille-feuille'

    Read more

  • French court drops ‘hate speech’ case against Bob Dylan

    Read more

  • Algeria rights crackdown slammed ahead of election

    Read more

  • Iraq closes notorious Abu Ghraib jail over security fears

    Read more

  • In ‘Tom at the Farm’, Xavier Dolan blends Hitchcock and homoeroticism

    Read more

Asia-pacific

‘Devastating’ cyclone slams Australia's northeast coast

©

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2011-02-02

Residents of northeastern Australia have been hit by devastating cyclone Yasi, stretching 650 kilometres across and packing winds with speeds of up to 290 kilometres an hour. The storm made landfall around midnight (1400 GMT).

AFP - A terrifying top-strength cyclone slammed into Australia's populous northeast coast Thursday leaving a trail of destruction, the worst storm to batter the region in a century.

Howling winds whipped up by Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi with speeds of up to 290 kilometres (181 miles) per hour ripped off roofs, felled trees and cut power lines as the storm crossed the Queensland coast.

Yasi made landfall around midnight (1400 GMT), the Bureau of Meteorology said, after the cyclone was upgraded early in the day to a category five storm from category four.

The storm made landfall near Mission Beach, which lies in the heart of a tourism and agriculture-rich area 180 kilometres south of Cairns, gateway to the Great Barrier Reef.

The bureau later downgraded the cyclone to a category three storm and said it would continue to weaken as it moved in a west-southwesterly direction but said it remained dangerous.

"The very destructive core, with gusts up to 205 km/h, is continuing to move inland west of Cardwell towards the Georgetown area," it said.

"Destructive winds with gusts in excess of 125 km/h are occurring between Innisfail and Townsville and extending inland to east of Georgetown."

The stricken area's million residents were earlier warned of an "extremely dangerous sea level rise" and "very destructive" winds accompanying Yasi's arrival, posing a severe threat to life.

State disaster coordinator Ian Stewart said deaths in Yasi's terrible path were "very likely".

"Unfortunately we are going to see significant destruction of buildings... and it is very likely that we will see deaths occur. We have not hidden from that fact," he told Sky News.

Local councillor Ross Sorbello told the Australian Associated Press (AAP) the scene in the north Queensland town of Tully was one of "mass devastation" with roofs ripped from homes.

Tully resident Stephanie Grimaz said houses in her street had been ripped apart.

"The flat from across the street is in our front yard and we can see other houses which have just been destroyed," she told AAP.

Forecasters had earlier said that Yasi, the first category five storm to hit the area since 1918, was likely to be "more life-threatening than any (storm) experienced during recent generations."

State Premier Anna Bligh echoed the grim note of caution, urging residents to steel themselves for what dawn and the passing of the storm might reveal.

"Without doubt we are set to encounter scenes of devastation and heartbreak on an unprecedented scale," she said.

"It will take all of us and all of our strength to overcome this. The next 24 hours I think are going to be very, very tough ones for everybody."

More than 10,000 seaside residents and tourists were sheltering in 20 evacuation centres across the region -- some so packed that people were turned away -- while tens of thousands more were staying with family and friends.

Locals further from the water were told to batten down and prepare a "safe room" such as a bathroom or a basement, with mattresses, pillows, a radio, food and water supplies to wait out the cyclone.

About 4,000 soldiers were on standby to help residents when the storm passed, but until then, locals were on their own as it was too dangerous to deploy emergency personnel, officials said.

Yasi was shaping up as the worst cyclone in Australian history, Prime Minister Julia Gillard said, adding the nation was with Queenslanders as they faced "many, many dreadful, frightening hours" of destruction.

"This is probably the worst cyclone that our nation has ever seen," Gillard said.

Bligh said grave fears were held for major power transmission lines in the region, never before tested at category five winds, warning that their failure would be a "catastrophic" issue for the entire state.

"We are planning for an aftermath that may see a catastrophic failure of essential services," she said.

The storm's size and power dwarfs Cyclone Tracy, which hit the northern Australian city of Darwin in 1974, killing 71 people and flattening more than 90 percent of its houses.

It comes after scores of Queensland towns were devastated and more than 30 people killed by flooding in recent weeks that caused Australia's most expensive natural disaster on record.

Date created : 2011-02-01

  • AUSTRALIA

    Thousands flee as flood waters swamp Australia's Victoria state

    Read more

  • AUSTRALIA

    'Heartache and grief' as Brisbane residents dig out after devastating flood

    Read more

Comments

COMMENT(S)