Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

Dotard: an educational insult

Read more

#TECH 24

Medtech: Repairing the human body

Read more

ENCORE!

Jennifer Lawrence on why she's unafraid to speak out

Read more

#THE 51%

Hola "Ellas Hoy" - The 51 Percent welcomes its sister show on FRANCE 24 Spanish

Read more

YOU ARE HERE

A stroll through the Corsican city of Calvi, jewel of the Mediterranean

Read more

REPORTERS

The torment of Christians living in Syria’s Khabur valley

Read more

FOCUS

'Generation Merkel' yearns for continuity and stability

Read more

DOWN TO EARTH

Amazon rainforest pays heavy price for Brazil's political crisis

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Presidential election re-run pushed back to October 26th

Read more

Middle east

Islamists reject offer to join coalition government with reform mandate

Latest update : 2011-02-06

Jordan's Islamist opposition said on Sunday it has rejected an offer to join a coalition headed by Prime Minister Marruf Bakhit after a week of street demonstrations led King Abdullah II to form a new government.

REUTERS - Jordan's Islamist opposition said on Sunday it has rejected an offer to join a new government headed by Prime Minister Marruf Bakhit and tasked with enhancing reforms.

"We have received an offer to join to the government of Marruf Bakhit, but we refused," Hamzah Mansur, leader of the powerful Islamic Action Front (IAF), the politial arm of the Muslim Brotherhood in Jordan, told AFP.

"We did not discuss the details of the offer, but all what I can say is that taking part in this government under the current circumstances is out of the question," he said.

While the IAF's internal bylaws do not prevent the Islamists from joining government, "acceptable participation for us is the one that comes through national consensus and parliamentary elections," he added.

"We are not asking for miracles. Our demands are realistic, practical and doable. We demand early general polls in line with a new electoral law."

The IAF boycotted the general election in November in protest at constituency boundaries set up under a new electoral law, which it said over-represented rural areas considered loyal to the government.

Bakhit said on Saturday that his cabinet -- which he hopes to have in place by Thursday -- would "include personalities who are credible and close to the people."

King Abdullah II instructed the 64-year-old career soldier and past prime minister to undertake a sweeping programme of political and economic reforms following street protests.

When Bakhit was appointed, the Islamist opposition questioned his reformist credentials. But Islamist leaders expressed satisfaction on Friday after meeting both him and the monarch.

Interactive timeline of the turmoil sweeping across the Arab world

Date created : 2011-02-06

  • JORDAN

    Tunisia-inspired protests force Jordan's king to name new premier

    Read more

  • JORDAN

    Jordan rejects criticism on human rights

    Read more

  • JORDAN

    Thousands gather to call for the government to step down

    Read more

COMMENT(S)