Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

FOCUS

Arms race: Delegations eye lucrative deals at Abu Dhabi military fair

Read more

FRENCH CONNECTIONS

France's Salon de l'Agriculture: Celebrating a struggling sector

Read more

INSIDE THE AMERICAS

Brazil: Carnival in a time of crisis

Read more

ENCORE!

A long way from home: 'Lion' stars Nicole Kidman and Dev Patel hit the red carpet

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

'Pineapple Pizza Tests Limits of Presidential Power in Iceland'

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

French papers react to alliance between centrists Macron and Bayrou

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Peugeot's profits double as Opel takeover eyed

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Bayrou decides to march with Macron

Read more

THE DEBATE

France's Topsy-Turvy Election: Uncertain outcome as insurgents blow away old guard (part 1)

Read more

REPORTERS

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time. And you can watch it online as early as Friday.

Latest update : 2011-02-18

Ivory Coast: when politics leads to paralysis

The political deadlock in Ivory Coast and ensuing sanctions have plunged the country into an unprecedented economic crisis, bringing unemployment, fuel shortages and dwindling supplies of everyday essentials. The crisis is a growing burden on the daily lives of Ivorians, who are the primary victims of the situation.

The post-election crisis in Ivory Coast has dragged on now for more than two months. Both the outgoing leader Laurent Gbagbo and opposition leader Alassane Ouattara have been sworn in as president, and they and their supporters remain in political deadlock. During the crisis, much has been said of the country’s two governments, but what has life been like for the Ivorian people? How are they coping in these unprecedented circumstances? There are growing signs that the economy is suffering, and that everyday life is becoming increasingly strained.

Our reporters visited different areas of Ivory Coast’s main city Abidjan, to witness everyday life and how it has changed. Some people, especially in pro-Ouattara areas, say they are living in constant fear. Under nightly curfews, they erect barricades, afraid that militias will enter. Other citizens say that the cost of living has shot up since the political crisis, and that they’re now only eating one meal per day. And businesses are warning of mounting logistical and cash flow problems, which for them spell danger ahead.

By Willy BRACCIANO , Catherine NORRIS TRENT

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2017-02-16 Asia-pacific

Thailand still mourning its beloved King Bhumibol

He was the world’s richest monarch – wealthier than Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II - and the longest-serving, spending 70 years on the throne. Thailand’s King Bhumibol Adulyadej,...

Read more

2017-02-09 Africa

Rose Nathike: S. Sudan athlete’s race for a better life

For Rose Nathike, running is a way of life. First the South Sudanese athlete ran to flee the war in Sudan. Then she trained at her refugee camp in northern Kenya. Finally she...

Read more

2017-02-02 jihad

Video: Jihad Sisters, French women bound for ISIS

France 24 brings you an exceptional documentary in partnership with French TV news magazine "Envoyé spécial", on the hidden women of the jihadist web, the "sisters" of the...

Read more

2017-01-26 Asia-pacific

Flight MH370: Families of missing passengers search for the truth

It’s a unique case in the history of modern aviation. Nearly three years after its disappearance, Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, a Boeing 777 with 239 people on board, has still...

Read more

2017-01-19 Burundi

Burundi: Fear and Exile

When Burundi’s President Pierre Nkurunziza announced he was running for a controversial third mandate in April 2015, he sparked a major crisis and many demonstrations. Since...

Read more