Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

DEBATE

Greece Takes on Europe: Historic Elections Rock Status Quo (part 2)

Read more

DEBATE

Greece Takes on Europe: Historic Elections Rock Status Quo (part 1)

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Far-left and far-right celebrate Syriza's victory

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Colombia's Santos hoping for end to FARC conflict 'this year'

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

Fighting terrorism: Does Europe have a plan?

Read more

ENCORE!

Music show: Björk, Charlie Winston and Ray Lema

Read more

FOCUS

Eastern Ukraine dragged deeper into war

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

What would a Syriza victory mean for Greece?

Read more

FOCUS

Set, the new pro-Putin youth movement

Read more

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 8.40 pm Paris time.

REPORTERS

REPORTERS

Latest update : 2011-02-18

Ivory Coast: when politics leads to paralysis

The political deadlock in Ivory Coast and ensuing sanctions have plunged the country into an unprecedented economic crisis, bringing unemployment, fuel shortages and dwindling supplies of everyday essentials. The crisis is a growing burden on the daily lives of Ivorians, who are the primary victims of the situation.

The post-election crisis in Ivory Coast has dragged on now for more than two months. Both the outgoing leader Laurent Gbagbo and opposition leader Alassane Ouattara have been sworn in as president, and they and their supporters remain in political deadlock. During the crisis, much has been said of the country’s two governments, but what has life been like for the Ivorian people? How are they coping in these unprecedented circumstances? There are growing signs that the economy is suffering, and that everyday life is becoming increasingly strained.

Our reporters visited different areas of Ivory Coast’s main city Abidjan, to witness everyday life and how it has changed. Some people, especially in pro-Ouattara areas, say they are living in constant fear. Under nightly curfews, they erect barricades, afraid that militias will enter. Other citizens say that the cost of living has shot up since the political crisis, and that they’re now only eating one meal per day. And businesses are warning of mounting logistical and cash flow problems, which for them spell danger ahead.

By Willy BRACCIANO , Catherine NORRIS TRENT

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2015-01-16 Charlie Hebdo

Paris attacks: Who were the terrorists?

For three days, they spread fear and horror across France, killing 17 people before being shot dead by police. Their rampage began with an attack on satirical weekly Charlie...

Read more

2015-01-09 Iran

Young Iranians living on the edge

In Iran, penalties for drinking, dancing or partying can be severe: heavy fines, imprisonment, even death by hanging. Two out of three Iranians are under 30 years old. Now,...

Read more

2015-01-02 Ukraine

Donetsk, the price of separation

The war in eastern Ukraine is far from over, but with the arrival of winter, it's no longer only the guns and shellfire that worry the inhabitants of the self-proclaimed Republic...

Read more

2014-12-26 Syria

France 24’s best documentaries of 2014

This year, France 24 brought you major reports from around the world. Don't miss our highlights from 2014: from the partition of Ukraine to the battle against Ebola in Liberia,...

Read more

2014-12-19 Argentina

Argentina: The Kirchner era

The woman dubbed by some the new Eva Perón is a divisive figure. Cristina Kirchner succeeded her husband, Nestor, as president of Argentina back in 2007. A year ahead of...

Read more