Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

AFRICA NEWS

Ebola virus: US to send 3,000 troops to West Africa

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Nigeria attack: Bomb blast in college in Kano

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Ebola: Lockdown brings Sierra Leone capital to a halt

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Sarkozy's political comeback: did he ever leave?

Read more

DEBATE

The World This Week

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

Travel chaos: Air France pilots take industrial action

Read more

THE BUSINESS INTERVIEW

Christian Kastrop, Director of Policy Studies, OECD

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Ebola: UN Security Council unanimously passes resolution

Read more

ENCORE!

Author Kiran Desai on early success and the Booker Prize

Read more

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 8.40 pm Paris time.

REPORTERS

REPORTERS

Latest update : 2011-02-18

Ivory Coast: when politics leads to paralysis

The political deadlock in Ivory Coast and ensuing sanctions have plunged the country into an unprecedented economic crisis, bringing unemployment, fuel shortages and dwindling supplies of everyday essentials. The crisis is a growing burden on the daily lives of Ivorians, who are the primary victims of the situation.

The post-election crisis in Ivory Coast has dragged on now for more than two months. Both the outgoing leader Laurent Gbagbo and opposition leader Alassane Ouattara have been sworn in as president, and they and their supporters remain in political deadlock. During the crisis, much has been said of the country’s two governments, but what has life been like for the Ivorian people? How are they coping in these unprecedented circumstances? There are growing signs that the economy is suffering, and that everyday life is becoming increasingly strained.

Our reporters visited different areas of Ivory Coast’s main city Abidjan, to witness everyday life and how it has changed. Some people, especially in pro-Ouattara areas, say they are living in constant fear. Under nightly curfews, they erect barricades, afraid that militias will enter. Other citizens say that the cost of living has shot up since the political crisis, and that they’re now only eating one meal per day. And businesses are warning of mounting logistical and cash flow problems, which for them spell danger ahead.

By Willy BRACCIANO , Catherine NORRIS TRENT

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2014-09-19 Algeria

From Sarajevo to Guantanamo, the journey of the Algerian Six

The day after the 9/11 attacks, six Algerian nationals were arrested in Bosnia-Herzegovina. They were accused of being terrorists and plotting fresh attacks against the United...

Read more

2014-09-12 referendum

Scotland: On the path to independence?

On September 18, Scotland votes in a referendum on independence from the United Kingdom. A "Yes" at the ballot box would mean the end of a union that’s lasted over 300 years and...

Read more

2014-09-05 Iraq

Kurdish fighters on the front line against IS militants

Even as Western powers struggle to put together a coalition to tackle the self-proclaimed Islamic State (IS or ISIS), Kurdish fighters in northern Iraq have been battling for...

Read more

2013-05-03 Pakistan

Pakistan: Imran Khan, from the cricket field to politics

When Pakistanis go to the polls to choose a new prime minister on May 11th, one candidate could seriously shake up the race. Cricketer-turned-politician Imran Khan, who led the...

Read more

2014-08-08 WWI centenary

WWI: The Somme, Land of Remembrance

Every year in France, more than 200,000 visitors walk across the battlefields of the Somme. They come from Great Britain, Canada or even from Australia and New Zealand with one...

Read more