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An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

IN THE PAPERS

IN THE PAPERS

Latest update : 2011-03-16

Japan’s faceless heroes

A group of 50 Japanese workers have decided to stay behind at the Fukushima power plant, in a bid to prevent a massive radiation leak. Workers’ names haven’t been revealed but they are thought to be volunteers, firefighters and police officers. Prepared to risk their lives and face Japan’s worst catastrophe in decades, the workers are seen as heroes.

 

Japan’s neighboring countries are closely monitoring the situation. The nuclear threat is on the front page of JoongAng Daily (S.Korea), The Moscow Times, the China Daily, and The Bangkok Post.
 
Meanwhile, the Wall Street Journal (Asia) focuses on life in Iwaki, a city located just outside the 20km evacuation zone, on the coast of Northeastern Japan.
The New York Times reports about the “faceless 50”, ready to sacrifice themselves for the good of the country. 
 
The Independent notes that the health of those workers will determine the seriousness of the leak. The more ill they get, the higher the radiation levels...
 
Five days after the earthquake and the tsunami, the death toll keeps rising. According to The Guardian, local authorities are considering mass burials as opposed to traditional cremations.
 
And finally, a sign of hope published in The Daily Mirror.

 

By Aurore Cloe DUPUIS

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