Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

WEB NEWS

Nigerian web users call for end to violence

Read more

FOCUS

Bitcoin in the US: A monetary revolution?

Read more

ENCORE!

Fast cars and slow trains

Read more

WEB NEWS

Chile: online mobilization to help Valparaiso fire victims

Read more

FACE-OFF

François Hollande: France's most unpopular president

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Mansouria Mokhefi, Middle East and North Africa specialist

Read more

LIFESTYLES

Sustainable cuisine

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Google Was Making A Space Elevator And A Hoverboard, But Couldn't Get Them To Work

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

A bitter pill to swallow

Read more

  • Wheelchair-bound Bouteflika votes in Algerian election

    Read more

  • Films by four French directors short-listed for Cannes' top prize

    Read more

  • Ukraine talks open in Geneva as Putin talks tough on TV

    Read more

  • Pro-Russian separatists killed in attack on Black Sea base

    Read more

  • After cup defeat, Spanish pundits read last rites for Barcelona

    Read more

  • Frantic search for survivors of sunken South Korea ferry

    Read more

  • India heads to polls in single largest day of voting

    Read more

  • Man executed in Texas for 2002 triple murder

    Read more

  • Scandal-hit French doctor Jacques Servier dies at 92

    Read more

  • Belgian head of wildlife reserve shot in DR Congo

    Read more

  • Crunch talks on Ukraine begin in Geneva

    Read more

  • Stagehand of God? Maradona's legendary goal inspires a play

    Read more

  • US rolls out red carpet for French critic of capitalism

    Read more

  • N. Korea not amused by London hair salon's Kim Jong-un ad

    Read more

  • Real Madrid beat old foes Barcelona to lift Copa del Rey

    Read more

  • France's new PM targets welfare in drive to cut spending

    Read more

  • Campaigning against Bouteflika's re-election... in France

    Read more

  • Brazil club Mineiro cancel Anelka signing after no-show

    Read more

  • Syria 'torture' photos silence UN Security Council members

    Read more

  • Paris laboratory loses deadly SARS virus samples

    Read more

  • More than 100 schoolgirls kidnapped in northeast Nigeria

    Read more

  • New York police disband unit targeting Muslims

    Read more

  • 'Miracle girl' healthy after seven-organ transplant in Paris

    Read more

  • Paris police memo calling for Roma eviction ‘rectified’

    Read more

  • Burgundy digs into France's bureaucratic 'mille-feuille'

    Read more

Business

France bans Facebook and Twitter promotion on TV

©

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2011-06-06

France has decreed that TV and radio stations cannot promote Facebook or Twitter sites as it breaches a 1992 decree targeting secret advertising. Some bloggers argue the move shows that France is out of touch with the digital age.

AP - No plugging of Twitter accounts or Facebook pages on French broadcast airwaves.

France’s audiovisual authority says that TV and radio stations that promote their sites on the two gargantuan social media services on air are actually engaging in secret and unfair advertising.

Some French bloggers, bemoaning that their country seems out of touch with the Digital Age, pilloried what it considered an antiquated stance.

On May 27, the Superior Audiovisual Council, or CSA, said that broadcasters could legally point viewers or listeners to their sites on generic “social media” but they may not cite services like Facebook or Twitter by name.

The CSA said Monday that Facebook or Twitter could be cited only when a report or program merits a specific reference to those sites.

“We are not in the United States where you buy frequencies to get a TV channel and then you do pretty much whatever you want on your channel,” said Christine Kelly, a member of the council.

In France you don’t buy the frequency but get one for free and in exchange “there are rules you must respect,” Kelly told Associated Press Television News.

Among the rules is a 1992 decree on combatting secret advertising on radio and television.

The pronouncement went largely unnoticed in traditional media until bloggers, many of them critical, picked up on it.

It came soon after President Nicolas Sarkozy hosted Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckberberg and other Internet magnates for a conference on how much to regulate the online world.

France has long had a reputation as tough on cyberspace, notably in efforts to protect copyrights. It was not immediately clear whether other countries maintain similar airwave bans about references to Facebook or Twitter.

In its one-paragraph statement in response to a query from an unspecified broadcaster, the audiovisual regulator said specific references to the social networking sites would violate the 1992 law banning secret advertising.

It argued that redirecting viewers to generic social media instead would still be “informative” without plugging a specific site.

A CSA spokeswoman, who said she could not be identified by name because of agency rules, noted some networks often blur out the images of corporate logos in the backdrop of TV shots to avoid secret advertising.

Kelly, of the CSA, said that radio stations, in particular, were “a bit surprised” by the reminder “because it’s mainly the radio stations” which were citing Twitter and Facebook.

France’s leading TV channel, TF1, refused to comment on the issue, and Facebook’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Loic Le Meur, a French blogger who once advised President Nicolas Sarkozy on Internet policy, lambasted the decision. “French regulation forbids TV networks to say Facebook or Twitter? My Country is screwed,” he wrote on Twitter.

Sarkozy has embraced some social media sites, and some 450,000 people “like” his Facebook page. He is generally in favor of more Internet regulation, not less.

The CSA, created in 1989, is charged with ensuring fairness on French audiovisual communication, such as TV time granted political candidates, and with the protection of children from some types of programming.

 

Date created : 2011-06-06

  • TECHNOLOGY

    Appeals court rules in favour of Facebook founder Zuckerberg

    Read more

  • FRANCE

    Sarkozy's Facebook page hacked

    Read more

  • INTERNET

    Facebook grants more control over personal info

    Read more

Comments

COMMENT(S)