Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - July 25th, 2014

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Search of Air Algerie crash site continues

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Sarkozy, Hollande and the scooter wars

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Confusion online over Air Algérie flight

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - July 25th, 2014 (part 2)

Read more

REPORTERS

Halal tourism on the rise

Read more

ENCORE!

Tunisia's Carthage International Festival turns 50

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

WWI Centenary: the battle for Verdun

Read more

THE BUSINESS INTERVIEW

When big companies want to do good

Read more

  • Nibali joins elite group with Tour de France win

    Read more

  • Boko Haram kidnap Cameroon minister's wife in deadly attack

    Read more

  • France calls on its nationals to leave Libya as violence escalates

    Read more

  • Netanyahu says Hamas 'violating its own ceasefire'

    Read more

  • Muslims prepare for Eid al-Fitr festival

    Read more

  • ‘Irresponsible’ American dad tries to scale Mont Blanc with children

    Read more

  • Ukraine fighting prevents observers from accessing MH17 crash site

    Read more

  • In pictures: Crowds flock to enjoy the Tour de France show

    Read more

  • Video: At the scene of the Air Algérie crash in Mali

    Read more

  • Costa Concordia arrives in port of Genoa to be scrapped

    Read more

  • In pictures: Youths clash with police at banned Gaza protest

    Read more

  • Russia lashes out at new EU sanctions over Ukraine

    Read more

  • Bodies of all Air Algérie crash victims to be brought to France

    Read more

  • Syrian army and ISIS both claim advances

    Read more

  • Briton kidnapped in Yemen freed after five months

    Read more

  • Nibali rides serenely toward a place in Tour history

    Read more

  • Germany's Tony Martin wins 20th stage of Tour de France

    Read more

  • New round of Gaza ceasefire talks takes place in Paris

    Read more

Europe

NATO talks to reassess Libyan, Afghan commitments

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2011-06-08

NATO defence ministers launch two days of talks in Brussels on Tuesday aimed at reevaluating months of air strikes on regime targets in Libya and NATO's 10-year-long commitment to the war in Afghanistan.

AFP - NATO defence ministers huddle Wednesday for talks on the air war in Libya amid calls for allies to step up their contributions as strikes to dislodge a defiant Moamer Kadhafi escalate.
              
With NATO fighting in two continents, the ministers meeting for two days of talks in Brussels were to discuss the nearly three-month-old air war in Libya as well as the nearly 10-year-old ground battle in Afghanistan.
              
The ministers will later Wednesday meet with their Russian counterpart for discussions on a missile shield for Europe.
              
While the alliance is looking to start a drawdown of ground forces in Afghanistan in July, NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen wants NATO members that have taken a backseat in Libya to contribute more to the mission.
              
Although Kadhafi still controls much of western Libya including his Tripoli stronghold, NATO says it is only a matter of time before he goes and it has increased the pressure with daily strikes on Tripoli to hasten that day.
              

"Obviously some of those allies and partners carrying the heavy burden start to ask whether it would be possible to broaden the participation a bit, and that's the point I will focus on at the defence ministers meeting," Rasmussen said Monday.
              
Only eight of the alliance's 28 members, plus non-NATO partner the United Arab Emirates, have conducted air strikes. France and Britain have carried out the bulk of the air raids.
              
Others take part in other aspects of the mission, but around a dozen have not contributed any assets.
              
A wave of NATO air strikes battered Tripoli again early Wednesday, piling pressure on Kadhafi, who in an audio broadcast said he was "near" the bombing but vowed never to surrender.
              
NATO has vowed to keep pounding the Kadhafi regime as long as civilians are threatened and is already thinking about what role it will have the day after the veteran strongman falls, as it predicts he inevitably will.
              
US Admiral Samuel Locklear, a senior NATO commander, suggested last week that a small force might be necessary after Kadhafi leaves power. The troops, he added, could be provided by the UN, the European Union or NATO.
              
"We are not pursuing planning on that, we are having discussions about it because we may or (may) not have to do something quickly," he said.
              
Rasmussen said NATO could help reform Libya's defence and security sector but he did not see a "major role" for the alliance, leaving the task of guiding the Libyans in a democratic transition to the United Nations.

 

Date created : 2011-06-08

  • LIBYA

    NATO steps up attack on Tripoli with daytime raids

    Read more

  • AFGHANISTAN

    NATO apologises for deadly air strike on civilians

    Read more

  • LIBYA

    Gaddafi taunts NATO, rebels hold White House meeting

    Read more

COMMENT(S)