Don't miss




Almost 900 children held by Nigeria's army released, Unicef says

Read more


Is drafting women into the army gender equality? It's the latest topic of the 2016 race to the White House

Read more


After The Jungle, How low can Hollande go ? (Part 1)

Read more

#TECH 24

'Tech-ing' up US politics

Read more


The secrets of Montmartre

Read more


US presidential election: It's the economy, stupid!

Read more


US civilian medics help peshmerga fighters in Iraq

Read more


'The Wire' and 'Treme' star Wendell Pierce on the healing power of art

Read more


TATA hits back at ousted chairman

Read more

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time. And you can watch it online as early as Friday.



Latest update : 2011-07-18

The Muslim Brotherhood’s bid for power

The Muslim Brotherhood is no longer afraid to show its face. The movement, banned in Egypt since 1954, has been allowed to establish its own political party and to run in the next parliamentary elections. Its influence continues to grow, thanks to its charity work, which includes providing aid and free education to the poor. But who are its members? Does it really seek a democratic future for Egypt?

Could Egypt become a theocracy? The prospect of an Islamic state is not such a vague prospect: for over a century, the Muslim Brotherhood has been trying to make it a caliphate.

These days, their activists are no longer operating underground. Sympathisers can take to the streets without fear of being imprisoned. The organisation is no longer playing games and knows it needs to act swiftly to capitalise on its new freedom to gain ground.

The Muslim Brothers are the most organised opposition group in the run-up to the October elections. This "band of brothers" which was set up by Hassan Al-Banna in 1928 is often shrouded in mystery and sometimes provokes fear, but has nonetheless come onto the political landscape via a political party: the Freedom and Justice Party. Islamic activists entice the population through a network of social associations all over the country. They have charitable work to win the hearts of the population, and television to win their minds.

The organisation does not envisage gaining a majority, nor will it put forward a presidential candidate. But it does not condone the “Muslim Brotherhood Youth” protesters. What guarantees exist that they will respect democracy in the new Egypt? And why do they incessantly talk about "Jihad being our path"? Our reporters in Egypt decided to investigate.

By Noreddine BEZZIOU , Adel GASTEL



2016-10-27 US Presidential Election 2016

Video: Florida, ultimate battleground in the race to the White House

As the US presidential election nears, FRANCE 24 takes you to Florida, a state where both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are campaigning hard. In this “swing state”, voters...

Read more

2016-10-19 Iraq

Video: On the road to Mosul with Iraqi, Kurdish forces

A few weeks before Iraqi and Kurdish forces launched their offensive to retake Mosul from Islamic State group jihadists, our reporters in Iraq witnessed the final preparations...

Read more

2016-10-13 Russia

The Russian secret behind Ukraine’s self-declared 'Donetsk Republic'

Two years after pro-Russian separatists declared the "Donetsk People's Republic", fighting between the Ukrainian army and separatist forces continues. But who is arming the...

Read more

2016-10-07 Argentina

Stolen children of Argentina’s dictatorship search for the truth

Imagine discovering that your surname, first name and date of birth are all lies? That your family is not your real family? Hundreds of Argentineans born during the dictatorship...

Read more

2016-09-30 Colombia

Video: The final days of Colombia’s FARC guerilla

After waging a 52-year-long insurgency against the authorities in Bogota, Colombia’s FARC guerilla agreed to finally end the bloody conflict that has cost tens of thousands of...

Read more