Don't miss



#THE 51%

The rise of artificial intelligence: How will it impact women’s jobs

Read more


Brexit: Britain divided

Read more


Was the French national strike a success?

Read more


Discovering France's Mediterranean shipwrecks

Read more


Menswear, spring 2018: Men are changing, for good!

Read more


German villages sacrificed in the name of coal

Read more


'War mustache goes to Washington'

Read more


Markets stumble as China-US trade conflict ramps up

Read more


Sarkozy's TV plea of innocence

Read more


An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2011-07-18

The Muslim Brotherhood’s bid for power

The Muslim Brotherhood is no longer afraid to show its face. The movement, banned in Egypt since 1954, has been allowed to establish its own political party and to run in the next parliamentary elections. Its influence continues to grow, thanks to its charity work, which includes providing aid and free education to the poor. But who are its members? Does it really seek a democratic future for Egypt?

Could Egypt become a theocracy? The prospect of an Islamic state is not such a vague prospect: for over a century, the Muslim Brotherhood has been trying to make it a caliphate.

These days, their activists are no longer operating underground. Sympathisers can take to the streets without fear of being imprisoned. The organisation is no longer playing games and knows it needs to act swiftly to capitalise on its new freedom to gain ground.

The Muslim Brothers are the most organised opposition group in the run-up to the October elections. This "band of brothers" which was set up by Hassan Al-Banna in 1928 is often shrouded in mystery and sometimes provokes fear, but has nonetheless come onto the political landscape via a political party: the Freedom and Justice Party. Islamic activists entice the population through a network of social associations all over the country. They have charitable work to win the hearts of the population, and television to win their minds.

The organisation does not envisage gaining a majority, nor will it put forward a presidential candidate. But it does not condone the “Muslim Brotherhood Youth” protesters. What guarantees exist that they will respect democracy in the new Egypt? And why do they incessantly talk about "Jihad being our path"? Our reporters in Egypt decided to investigate.

By Noreddine BEZZIOU , Adel GASTEL



2018-03-15 Europe

Video: Kosovo’s growing pains

Kosovo is Europe’s youngest nation. Last month, it celebrated the tenth anniversary of its independence. But the small Balkan country, which has an Albanian majority and Serbian...

Read more

2018-03-08 Asia-pacific

Exclusive report: Escaping North Korea

As Kim Jong-un and Donald Trump surprise the world by agreeing to a historic meeting, we met with North Koreans who have fled the Pyongyang regime. Every year, hundreds of them...

Read more

2018-03-02 Africa

Video: Libyan city of Benghazi dreams of a brighter future

Benghazi is on its knees. Libya’s second-largest city is struggling to recover from four years of war between jihadist militias and the self-declared "Libyan National Army" led...

Read more

2018-02-23 Americas

'Never Again': The students pushing for US gun control

Many of the students who survived a horrific February 14 high school shooting in Florida have become activists demanding changes to US gun laws. Their campaign could well mark a...

Read more

2018-02-16 Africa

Video: Girls in Malawi victims of 'sexual cleansing' ritual

In the remote southern regions of Malawi, a violent tradition is practised on young women. Girls who reach puberty are forced to have sex with a "hyena", a man chosen by their...

Read more