Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

DEBATE

Gaza: A Truce At All Costs?

Read more

AFRICA NEWS

Central African Republic: Brazzaville ceasefire talks deliver fragile deal

Read more

FOCUS

Sluggish tourist season in Crimea

Read more

ENCORE!

Bartabas : Mixing Christ with Spanish music and dancing horses

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Shifts in the propaganda war waged between Israelis and Palestinians

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

French MPs face quandary in pro-Palestinian rallies

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Yezid Sayigh, Senior Associate at the Carnegie Middle East Center in Beirut

Read more

#TECH 24

Mind the Gender Gap : getting more women into the tech sector

Read more

INSIDE THE AMERICAS

Bolivian children: heading to work aged 10

Read more

  • Wreckage of Algeria plane found in Mali

    Read more

  • Air Algérie crash: 'We should eliminate the missile hypothesis'

    Read more

  • BNP to pay $80 million for defrauding US Dept of Agriculture

    Read more

  • Protest turns deadly as Palestinians rally against Gaza offensive

    Read more

  • Pope meets Sudanese Christian woman sentenced to death

    Read more

  • Deadly strike on UN shelter in Gaza Strip

    Read more

  • Italy’s Nibali cruises to victory in 18th stage of Tour de France

    Read more

  • Iraqi parliament elects moderate Kurd as president

    Read more

  • US, European agencies lift travel restrictions to Tel Aviv

    Read more

  • No end to fighting until Israel ends Gaza blockade, Hamas says

    Read more

  • Two foreign women shot dead in western Afghanistan

    Read more

  • At least 60 killed in attack on prison convoy near Baghdad

    Read more

  • Cycling is ‘winning the war on doping,’ says expert

    Read more

  • Ceasefire agreed for Central African Republic

    Read more

Americas

Debt crisis deepens as unyielding lawmakers continue to clash

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2011-07-24

Negotiations to raise the current US debt ceiling of $14.3 trillion reached an impasse on Saturday after congressional Democrats and Republicans clashed over how to reduce the country's deficit, as a possible US default looms.

REUTERS - New disagreement erupted late on Saturday between congressional Democrats and Republicans over the timetable for increasing U.S. borrowing authority, possibly jeopardizing efforts to avert a default.

Democratic and Republican leaders escalated their fight despite instructions from President Barack Obama earlier to produce a budget plan by Monday that would clear the way for Congress to raise the $14.3 trillion debt ceiling by Aug. 2.
 
Saying he was “deeply disappointed” by the lack of progress toward a deal to raise the credit limit built around deficit cuts, Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid said Republican “intransigence” was “pushing us to the brink of a default on the full faith and credit of the United States.”
 
The latest flare-up centered around a Republican plan being proposed behind closed doors calling for two installments of debt limit increases and deficit reduction.
 
Democrats said they only wanted to extend the debt limit once through the 2012 election year, a Democratic aide said.
 
Democrats insist upon tax increases as part of deficit reduction and fear that under the Republican plan they would be put off until next year in the midst of presidential and congressional re-election campaigns, or may be never happen.
 
Michael Steel, a spokesman for House Speaker John Boehner, the top Republican in Congress, said that “a two-step process is inevitable.” He also reiterated that a default “is not an option.”
 
Lawmakers nevertheless scrambled despite the new wrinkle to show by around 4 p.m. EDT Sunday—just before Asian markets kick off their trading week—that substantial progress was being made to avoid a U.S. default on its debt.
 
A Republican leadership aide said lawmakers are working on a plan for $3 trillion to $4 trillion in savings over 10 years, but another high-ranking Republican official said no numbers had been set.
 
Talks between Obama and Boehner collapsed in acrimony on Friday. In hopes of patching things up, Obama called Boehner, Reid, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell and House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi to the White House early on Saturday to discuss a path forward.
 
The four congressional leaders met in the Capitol later in the day as work got hung up on the question of whether to go for a long-term or shorter-term debt limit hike.
 
The lawmakers’ overall goal: Seal a deficit-reduction package of spending cuts and perhaps tax increases that will allow a vote by the August deadline to raise the U.S. debt ceiling beyond $14.3 trillion and avoid potential economic calamity.
 
Financial markets are growing more edgy and U.S. banks and businesses are making contingency plans for the possibility of a debt default that would drive up interest rates, sink the dollar and ripple through economies around the world.
 
Credit rating agencies want spending restraints for the United States to keep its prized Triple-A rating, which makes U.S. Treasuries the solid foundation for global investors and lowers borrowing costs for state governments, businesses, homeowners and consumers.
 
Investors followed developments throughout the day.
 
“We continue this weekend to monitor very closely the negotiations in Washington, with frequent updates and assessments. We are also evaluating reactions outside the United States,” Mohamed El-Erian, co-chief investment officer at Pacific Investment Management Co., told Reuters.
 
A breakdown in Washington, he feared, “will be highly detrimental to the already fragile health of both the U.S. and global economies.”
 
Lawmakers also were mindful of what could happen in financial markets if a deal is not quickly reached.
 
“I am concerned that there might be an adverse reaction in the markets,” Republican Representative Charles Dent said in a telephone interview with Reuters.
 
Dent said Boehner told members a default was not an option and lawmakers have to come to agreement.
 
“We need to have something posted online by Monday,” a Republican congressional aide said.
 
In the White House meeting, Obama warned lawmakers not to pursue a short-term extension of the debt limit.
 
“Congress should refrain from playing reckless political games with our economy. Instead, it should be responsible and do its job, avoiding default and cutting the deficit,” White House spokesman Jay Carney said after the talks.
 
A short-term extension of mere months could cause Wall Street credit agencies to strip America of its gold-plated triple-A rating and increase interest rates for American consumers, Obama told them.
 
Window quickly closing
 
With the world’s biggest economy set to run out of money to pay all of its bills on Aug. 2, the window was closing fast for a “grand bargain” of spending cuts and tax increases in exchange for Congress raising the debt ceiling.
 
The fits and starts in the negotiations have left both sides fuming. Obama has said he has agreed to deep spending cuts in social programs that make his own Democrats uneasy but that Republicans must allow some taxes to rise, a prospect they have rejected.
 
Before talks between Obama and Boehner collapsed Friday largely over how much revenue would be raised through tax reform—with Obama wanting $1.2 trillion over 10 years and Boehner putting $800 billion on the table.
 
Boehner has to overcome resistance from Tea Party movement conservatives in his own party and could run into problems for having signaled a willingness to give ground on revenue increases in closed-door talks at the White House.

 

Date created : 2011-07-24

  • USA

    Obama calls crisis talks to avert first-ever debt default

    Read more

  • USA

    Obama sees 'progress' in budget talks

    Read more

  • USA

    Obama warns of tax increase if debt ceiling is not raised

    Read more

COMMENT(S)