Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

US media reacts to ebola scare

Read more

DEBATE

How to Stop Ebola: Center for Disease Control Confirms First Case of Virus in US (part 2)

Read more

DEBATE

How to Stop Ebola: Center for Disease Control Confirms First Case of Virus in US

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

I will support Hillary Clinton, will.i.am tells France 24

Read more

FOCUS

Germany: Spread of radical Islam propaganda sparks concerns

Read more

ENCORE!

Corrie Nielsen: Up and Coming Talent at Paris Fashion Week

Read more

FACE-OFF

French Senate election: A new blow for Hollande

Read more

ENCORE!

Encore's Film Show: Julie Gayet, Denzel Washington, and cartoon madness

Read more

MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Turkey's strategy towards the Islamic State group

Read more

Culture

Hungarian-born novelist Agota Kristof dies at 75

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2011-07-30

Hungarian novelist Agota Kristof (pictured), whose books in French dealt with the trauma of war, has died at the age of 75. She was best known for her 1986 novel The Notebook, which many compared to the works of Samuel Beckett and Eugène Ionesco.

AFP - Hungarian-born French novelist Agota Kristof has died at her home in Switzerland at the age of 75, Hungarian press agency MTI said on Wednesday.          

"At the age of 75, Agota Kristof died at her home in Neuchatel on Tuesday night," it reported, citing the writer's family.
             
Born in Hungary in 1935, Kristof left her home country for Switzerland in 1956 after an anti-Soviet revolution was brutally put down by the military.
             
She wrote 23 books in French from 1978, though only nine were published. In the 1980s, she achieved success in western Europe with "Le Grand Cahier" (The Notebook), which reviewers compared favourably with the likes of Samuel Beckett and Eugene Ionesco.
             
Her work, which often dealt with post-war topics, was translated into a dozen languages, including her mother tongue.
              
She quit writing in 2005, shortly after the release of her autobiography.
             
Kristof received many awards in her career, including Italy's Alberto Moravia prize in 1988, two Swiss accolades: the Gottfried Keller prize in 2001 and Fredrich Schiller in 2005, and Austria's State Prize for European Literature in 2008.
             
In 2011, she was awarded Hungary's Kossuth prize for outstanding achievement.

 

Date created : 2011-07-28

COMMENT(S)