Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

BUSINESS DAILY

Trump vs Trudeau: Rising trade tensions between US and Canada

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Marine Le Pen, a 'normal' candidate?

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Booed in Berlin: Ivanka Trump criticised for comments at women's summit

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Tunisian parliament votes to ease repressive legislation on drugs

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Honouring slain policeman Xavier Jugelé

Read more

THE DEBATE

Trump's best enemy? North Korea in Washington's crosshairs (part 1)

Read more

THE DEBATE

Trump's best enemy? North Korea in Washington's crosshairs (part 2)

Read more

THE CAMPAIGN BEAT

Is there a risk of complacency in the Macron camp?

Read more

THE POLITICAL BRIEF

French presidential elections: A historic first-round result

Read more

Culture

Marvel unveils new mixed-race Spider Man

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2011-08-12

Marvel Comics has introduced a mixed-race Spider-Man to replace comic-book favourite Peter Parker, who was white, hailed from Queens and was killed off in June.

REUTERS - Marvel Comics on Wednesday unveiled a Spider-Man for our time—a half-black, half-Latino nerd named Miles Morales.

The new Spidey, who lives in Brooklyn, was revealed in Marvel Comics’ Ultimate Fallout Issue 4. He replaces longtime comic-book favorite Peter Parker, who was white, hailed from Queens and was killed in Ultimate Spider-Man Issue 160 in June.

“Going into this we knew we wanted to make a statement about the 21st century,” said Marvel editor in chief Axel Alonso.

“I’m mixed race. My mom is from England; my dad is from Mexico. When (President Barack) Obama was elected I cried—partly because he was African American but largely because of the fact that he was mixed race,” Alonso said.

“I remember what it was like to grow up mixed race. This is more and more prevalent in the United States and it speaks to our rich cultural heritage.”

Like Parker, Miles is a nerdy, awkward working-class kid from the outer boroughs of New York. But Parker was an orphan raised by his aunt and uncle in a traditionally white section of Queens.

Miles’ parents—his mother is black, his father Latino—are still alive, live in more racially diverse Brooklyn and play key roles in his story.

“Spider-Man is arguably the most recognizable superhero on the planet and little kids like my son Tito can relate to him because of the red-and-blue tights,” Alonso said.

“But when he peels off his mask now, he’s going to have a very different look and he’s going to resonate emotionally with all sorts of new readers.”

The new Ultimate Spider-Man series and Wednesday’s Ultimate Fallout issue are available digitally and in stores.

“I have no doubt that people will fall in love with Miles the way they did with Peter Parker regardless of what race or class or creed they are,” Alonso said.

 


 

Date created : 2011-08-06

COMMENT(S)