Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

FASHION

Paris Men's Fall/Winter 2015, freedom of speech triumphs

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Davos 2015: Businesses 'cautiously optimistic' in Japan

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Twitter storm as IMF boss Christine Lagarde hails Saudi King Abdullah as 'strong advocate of women'

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

DR CONGO: Senate amends controversial constitutional law

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Pope Family Planning: Heated Debate over Pontiff's 'Rabbit' Comments (part 2)

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Saudi King Abdullah Dies: Succession, Stability and Youth in Question (part 1)

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

France tackles terror

Read more

THE BUSINESS INTERVIEW

Jean-Pascal Tricoire, CEO of Schneider Electric: 'France is on a better track'

Read more

DEBATE

Davos debate: Can big business agree on climate deal? (part 2)

Read more

SCIENCE

China to launch test module for space station

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2011-09-29

China was set Thursday to launch the experimental space module Tiangong-1 from the Gobi desert in China's northwest. The unmanned module will test various space operations with an eye toward building a space station by 2020.

AFP - China will take its first step towards building a space station on Thursday, when it launches an experimental module ahead of National Day celebrations.

China sees its ambitious space programme as a symbol of its global stature and state media said the launch of Tiangong-1, or Heavenly Palace, represented a "milestone" for the country.

Tiangong-1 is scheduled to take off between 1316 and 1331 GMT from the Gobi desert in China's northwest, propelled by a Long March 2F rocket, ahead of China's National Day on October 1.

Chinese newspapers and websites splashed the planned launch across their front pages, while state-run television began counting down to the take off from early Thursday.

The unmanned 8.5-tonne module will test various space operations as a preliminary step towards building a space station by 2020.

As part of that goal, Tiangong-1 -- which has a two-year lifespan in space -- will receive the unmanned Shenzhou VIII spacecraft later this year in what would be the first Chinese docking in space.

If that succeeds, the module will then dock with two other spacecraft -- Shenzhou IX and X -- in 2012, both of which will have at least one astronaut on board.

The technology for docking in space is hard to master because the two vessels, placed in the same orbit and revolving around earth at some 28,000 km/h (17,360 mph), must come together progressively to avoid destroying each other.

China, which has only been open to the world for some 30 years, is playing catch-up in the space arena.

Just like its first manned spaceflight in 2003, the planned space docking later this year will emulate what the Americans and Russians achieved in the 1960s.

China aims to finish its space station, where astronauts can live autonomously for several months like on the International Space Station (ISS) or the former Russian Mir, by 2020.
 

Date created : 2011-09-29

  • SPACE

    Defunct satellite plummeted into Pacific, NASA says

    Read more

  • SCIENCE

    New planet could support life, astronomers say

    Read more

  • NASA

    Atlantis blasts off on final space shuttle mission

    Read more

COMMENT(S)