Don't miss




Guinea Conakry : 15 people wounded in clashes

Read more


Racist rows on both sides of the Channel

Read more


Migrant crisis puts the EU to the test, anger at Air France and the Fifa after Blatter (Part 2)

Read more


Nobel peace prize in Tunisia, Syria's red October and tensions in Israel (Part 1)

Read more


Volkswagen crisis: Can you turn scandal into success?

Read more


French rugby fever

Read more

#TECH 24

Apps and social networks: What happens to user data?

Read more


Is Bolivia's president turning his back on indigenous people?

Read more


The Hotel Negresco in Nice, a French legend

Read more

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time.



Latest update : 2011-10-07

Clearing up Fukushima

Fukushima was the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. Who would still want to work at the plant? And yet, thousands of people go there every day to work at cleaning away the radioactive debris and trying to secure the site. France 24 went to meet these workers who are ready to risk their lives to save Japan.

In the small world of Tokyo-based journalists, we knew that it would be difficult to meet the workers of Fukushima. Some could maybe talk to us, but only off-camera. Tepco, the operator of the stricken plant, was the first to disappoint us by refusing each of our requests. And no wonder: Tepco and its subcontractors strictly forbid the workers from speaking to the media.

Luckily, a Japanese woman who ended up becoming our interpreter managed to break the deadlock. A Christian, she worked as a volunteer with victims of the tsunami in Iwaki, a workers’ dormitory town located 40 km south of the Fukushima plant. Through a religious centre, she knew a worker who agreed to meet us. His name is Yukio and he is a colourful personality who wants to set the story straight about the plant’s workers. “Yes, it is hard work. But no, we are not slaves”, is his basic message.

The rest is all about luck…and blagging. We go straight to “J-Village”, the workers’ headquarters, located on the threshold of the 20 km-wide “forbidden zone” around the plant. We are not allowed to be there. Most of the workers know it and only give us a wary hello. But some of them agree to say a few words to us.

By Marie LINTON , Guillaume BRESSION , Makiko Segawa



2015-10-02 South Africa

Video: Farmers living in fear in South Africa

In South Africa, violence in the big cities like Pretoria, Johannesburg or Cape Town often makes the front pages of the newspapers, but crime that is terrorising countryside...

Read more

2015-09-24 Italy

Video: The children of Italy's 'Ndrangheta mafia

The 'Ndrangheta, or Calabrian mafia, is one of the most powerful criminal organisations in the world. Its annual turnover is estimated at tens of billions of euros. Nicknamed...

Read more

2015-09-18 migrants

Video: The journey to exile, from Greece to France

The migrant crisis is an issue set to plague Europe for years to come. FRANCE 24 dispatched Fernande van Tets, Karim Hakiki and Adel Gastel to cover the issue first hand, and...

Read more

2015-09-11 Algeria

Algeria's rugby pioneers seek international recognition

In Algeria, rugby is largely sidelined by the nation’s favourite sport: football. But thanks to the determination of a few avid players, Algeria has now formed a national rugby...

Read more

2015-09-04 Hungary

Video: Alongside migrants near Hungary’s razor wire fence

Every day, hundreds of migrants set off on the so-called Balkan route, one of the busiest irregular passages to Europe. Although longer, but less dangerous than that across the...

Read more