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Scotland Referendum: Will They Stay or Will They Go?

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Cleaning up Thailand's shady surrogacy industry

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Live from the newsroom, we provide an overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

IN THE PAPERS

IN THE PAPERS

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. Brown

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2014-09-19 UK

'It's No Go' as Scotland rejects independence

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Fri. 19.09.14: Papers around the world and social media react to Scotland’s historic vote, after 55% of voters rejected independence in a referendum.

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2014-09-18 Scotland

France looks on as Scotland votes

FRENCH PAPERS - Thurs. 18.09.14: French papers react to the Scottish independence referendum. Also, where are Hollande's dwindling supporters? And Nicolas Sarkozy makes new...

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2014-09-17 Scotland

Salmond's 'emotional eve-of poll plea to Scots to seize their historic opportunity'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Weds. 17.09.14: All eyes turn to Scotland today. With just 24 hours before the hotly anticipated independence referendum, the gloves are coming off. Also,...

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2014-09-17 Socialist Party (France)

'Valls is starting to act like Hollande'

FRENCH PAPERS - Weds. 17.09.14: Manuel Valls and his narrow vote of confidence are in the spotlight today. Up until the last minute, the French Prime Minister tried to sway...

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2014-09-16 French economy

Is Valls crying wolf?

FRENCH PAPERS - Tues. 16.09.14: Prime Minister Manuel Valls is in the spotlight today. For the second time in five months he’s going to ask lawmakers to give him a vote of...

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