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AFRICA NEWS

Search of Air Algerie crash site continues

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MEDIAWATCH

Sarkozy, Hollande and the scooter wars

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MEDIAWATCH

Confusion online over Air Algérie flight

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THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - July 25th, 2014 (part 2)

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THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World This Week - July 25th, 2014

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REPORTERS

Halal tourism on the rise

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ENCORE!

Tunisia's Carthage International Festival turns 50

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FRANCE IN FOCUS

WWI Centenary: the battle for Verdun

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THE BUSINESS INTERVIEW

When big companies want to do good

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Live from the newsroom, we provide an overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

IN THE PAPERS

IN THE PAPERS

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. Brown

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2014-07-25 plane crash

Coverage of the third plane crash in one week - from France, Algeria and Burkina Faso

The papers are awash in coverage of the Algerian plane crash – the third international plane disaster in just one week.

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2014-07-25 plane crash

Coverage of the plane crash that took 116 lives - almost half of them French

The French papers are leading with Air Algerie – the third major international plane crash in one week.

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2014-07-24 Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Shifts in the propaganda war waged between Israelis and Palestinians

Alongside the increasingly bloody conflict in Gaza, a war of words and graphic images has broken out, with some arguing that Israel’s PR machine is breaking down.

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2014-07-24 Gaza Strip

French MPs face quandary in pro-Palestinian rallies

Big pro-Palestinian rallies unfold in Paris, posing a diplomatic conundrum for the Socialist Party, whose MPs took part – against the advice of party leaders.

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2014-07-23 Russia

Was the UN chief’s speech in Tel Aviv really a 'shameful message'?

A call for the Israeli army to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, and in Europe the Daily Mail blames France and Germany for not reining in Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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