Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

FASHION

Fashion: What happened in 2014

Read more

WEB NEWS

Providing internet to rural areas

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Search for AirAsia jet continues

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

'If the missing AirAsia plane crashed, 2014 was one of deadliest years in almost a decade'

Read more

WEB NEWS

The best viral Christmas ads of 2014

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

'Collective behaviour problem' because of snow in Alps

Read more

WEB NEWS

290 Syrian cultural sites damaged by civil war

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

France: 2014 in review

Read more

#THE 51%

South Africa: Taking a stand against child marriage

Read more

Live from the newsroom, we provide an overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

IN THE PAPERS

IN THE PAPERS

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. Brown

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2014-12-29 Indonesia

'If the missing AirAsia plane crashed, 2014 was one of deadliest years in almost a decade'

The Jakarta Post reports on "desperate families awaiting news of loved ones" following the disappearance of an AirAsia Airbus. It reports on one family of nine who had a lucky...

Read more

2014-12-29 weather

'Collective behaviour problem' because of snow in Alps

"Let it snow, let it snow" is a favourite song at this time of year but it was not on the lips of many motorists heading to the French Alps. Around 15,000 people got caught by...

Read more

2014-12-24 Christmas

François Hollande's Christmas wish list

FRENCH PAPERS - Weds. 24.12.14: French papers focus on the traditional Christmas scandal: should nativity scenes be allowed in public spaces in secular France? Also, Slate...

Read more

2014-12-23 terrorism

10 'ambush gifts' NOT to give your children this Christmas

FRENCH PAPERS - Tues. 23.12.14: French papers focus the city of Nantes. Last night, a van ran into Christmas shoppers injuring several people. This comes after a similar incident...

Read more

2014-12-23 North Korea

Would a (hypothetical) US cyber attack on North Korea be legal?

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Tues. 23.12.14: The Wall Street Journal reports that the White House is considering an array of options against North Korea in response to that alleged...

Read more