Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

EYE ON AFRICA

Tunisia's Parliament votes on new Government

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

French court rules #burkini ban "clearly illegal"

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Biden in Turkey, Colombia Peace Deal, Ethiopia Olympic Protest (part 2)

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Earthquake in Italy, French Burkini Ruling (part 1)

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

The hidden secrets of Les Invalides

Read more

FOCUS

Pro-Opposition stronghold Port-Gentil feverishly awaits presidential elections

Read more

ENCORE!

Alexis Michalik: treading the boards in the footsteps of 'Edmond'

Read more

REPORTERS

Getting away with murder in DR Congo

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

'Why does Italy refuse to see the seismic risk?'

Read more

An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

IN THE PAPERS

IN THE PAPERS

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. Brown

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2016-08-26 Italy

'Why does Italy refuse to see the seismic risk?'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Fri. 26.08.16: As the death toll rises in the wake of Wednesday's deadly earthquake, Italy is starting to question why it was so UNDER prepared. Also, what...

Read more

2016-08-26 France

"The burkini trap"

FRENCH PAPERS - Fri. 26.08.16: It's still all about the so-called "burkini scandal" in today's papers. L'Opinion says the burkini "trap" has reached a fever pitch and is getting...

Read more

2016-08-25 France

British professor says 'no shame' in reading romance novels

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Thursday, August 25: World papers have derided France over its burkini ban, warning that it could lead to a 'Rosa Parks' moment. The other big story is...

Read more

2016-08-25 France

Libération:'STOP hunting for burkinis!'

FRENCH PAPERS - Thursday, August 25: The burkini brouhaha is making front page news as France's highest administrative court will decide whether or not to uphold the ban. The...

Read more

2016-08-24 Turkey

'Sexism is over, according to most men'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Weds. 24.08.16: Papers in the US and Turkey focus on today's meeting between Vice-President Joe Biden and Turkish authorities. Also, are Trump and Clinton...

Read more