Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE DEBATE

France Ambassadors Conference: Hollande outlines foreign policy priorities (part 1)

Read more

FOCUS

Video: Meeting US inmates as Obama pushes for criminal justice reform

Read more

REPORTERS

From the archives: Caught in the crossfire in Colombia

Read more

ENCORE!

Video: Harlan Coben on suspense, suburbia and success

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Democratic Republic of Congo: Inside Camp Garlic, a stronghold of ADF militia

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Rousseff defends her track record

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

More debates on the economy, not on the burkini

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Apple set to face record tax penalty from EU

Read more

An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

IN THE PAPERS

IN THE PAPERS

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. Brown

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2016-08-30 Dilma Rousseff

Rousseff defends her track record

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Tues. 30.08.16: Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is in the spotlight. Yesterday, she defended her record during a marathon session during her...

Read more

2016-08-30 French economy

More debates on the economy, not on the burkini

FRENCH PAPERS - Tues. 30.08.16: Business leaders are in the spotlight as they kick off their big annual meeting today. The two-day gathering comes at quite a particular time as...

Read more

2016-08-29 American football

Quarterback takes a stand by sitting down

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS – Mon. 29.08.16: Another big sports story is gripping the US media. San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick draws supporters and detractors over his...

Read more

2016-08-29 Islamophobia

Anger over restaurant's decision to deny service to Muslim women

FRENCH PAPERS – Mon. 29.08.16: Islam’s place in France continues to be the focus as media report on a restaurant refusing service to two Muslim women. The incident has caused a...

Read more

2016-08-26 Italy

'Why does Italy refuse to see the seismic risk?'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Fri. 26.08.16: As the death toll rises in the wake of Wednesday's deadly earthquake, Italy is starting to question why it was so UNDER prepared. Also, what...

Read more