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EYE ON AFRICA

In Memory of Jean-Karim Fall, 1958-2017

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MEDIAWATCH

Bad diplomacy, brawls & bromance

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ENCORE!

Cannes 2017: Pitch Perfect's Brittany Snow becomes an urban warrior

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THE WORLD THIS WEEK

US President wraps up world tour in Italy (Part 1)

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THE WORLD THIS WEEK

US President wraps up world tour in Italy (Part 2)

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FOCUS

The battle against illegal fishing in West Africa

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DOWN TO EARTH

Trump has already quit the Paris climate deal - just not publicly

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#TECH 24

The Ice Memory Project: A treasure trove for future scientists

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ENCORE!

Cannes 2017: Stars dig deep at AIDS gala dinner

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IN THE PAPERS

An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. Brown

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Archives

2017-05-26 G7

Uncertainty hangs over G7 summit as Trump wraps up foreign trip

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Fri. 26.05.17: As the G7 summit gets underway in Italy, US President Donald Trump brings "uncertainty and risk", The Guardian argues. Leaders are unlikely...

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2017-05-26 France

Trump's handshake battle with Macron goes viral

FRENCH PAPERS - Fri. 26.05.17: There's "a holiday feeling" in France, as temperatures rise across the country, Le Courrier Picard reports. Thousands headed to beaches on Baie de...

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2017-05-25 NATO

Donald Trump meets Emmanuel Macron: Can they get on?

FRENCH PAPERS - Thurs. 25.05.17: British police believe the Manchester bomber was just a "mule" who was part of a larger network. Libération asks whether this network could...

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2017-05-25 Manchester arena attack

Manchester bomber 'fits profile of other terrorists'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Thurs. 25.05.17: British papers take a closer look at the Manchester attacker's background. Like previous terrorists, he was involved in gangs as a...

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2017-05-24 Manchester arena attack

Manchester 'united' in its defiance against terrorism

IN THE INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Wednesday, May 24: Defiance is the tone seen widely in the British press after the Manchester attack that killed 22 people and injured dozens more...

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