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ENCORE!

Music show: Mykki Blanco, Van Morrison & The Weeknd’s duo with Daft Punk

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FOCUS

FRANCE 24 exclusive: The last stand for Libya’s Oil Crescent

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TALKING EUROPE

Greece’s minister of tourism: ‘Tourism is a government priority’

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TALKING EUROPE

Terrorism, strike actions and migrant crisis: Is the EU becoming less attractive to tourists?

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BUSINESS DAILY

Moody's cuts Turkey's credit rating to junk

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IN THE PAPERS

‘Grozny 1999 – Aleppo 2016’

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IN THE PAPERS

Trump and Clinton: 'It's all to play for'

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THE INTERVIEW

Turkish foreign minister says troops to move further into Syria

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EYE ON AFRICA

Court ruling expected on Gabon's contested election results

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An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

IN THE PAPERS

IN THE PAPERS

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. Brown

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2016-09-26 Russia

‘Grozny 1999 – Aleppo 2016’

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS 26.09.16: As the Syrian regime – backed by Russia – ramps up its attack on Aleppo, one picture of the devastation has come to define a bloody weekend....

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2016-09-26 Donald Trump

Trump and Clinton: 'It's all to play for'

FRENCH PAPERS 26.09.16: Clinton and Trump's upcoming TV debate dominates the front pages - for Les Echos the presidential race is a 'battle that's consuming America'. Also making...

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2016-09-23 US police shooting

Fatal shooting shakes Charlotte's self-image

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Fri. 23.09.16: The city of Charlotte, in North Carolina, is in the spotlight today. The city has become the scene of protests and unrest following the...

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2016-09-23 François Hollande

‘We, the French Muslim women’

FRENCH PAPERS - Fri. 23.09.16: Le Parisien focuses on François Hollande's presidential track record. Did he keep the promises he made to young people? Meanwhile, Libération gives...

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2016-09-22 Syria

Syrian ceasefire: Aleppo is between 'blood and fire'

IN THE INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Thursday, September 22: The Charlotte Observer urges police to release the video of the Keith Scott shooting; the US and Russia continue to spar...

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