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More than 100 Nigerian schoolgirls still missing after Boko Haram attack

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Italy helps integrate asylum seekers through training schemes

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Film show: Berlinale, 'The Shape of Water' and 'I, Tonya'

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Korea's divided families: Hopes for a reunion after decades apart

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Iranian singer Sepideh Jandaghi: The trapped voice

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Royal gatecrasher! Queen Elizabeth attends London Fashion Week

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BUSINESS DAILY

Venezuela launches its own cryptocurrency

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IN THE PRESS

The secrets of Jean-Marie Le Pen: Far-right party founder publishes tell-all

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EYE ON AFRICA

Tens of thousands bid farewell to Morgan Tsvangirai

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IN THE PRESS

An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. Brown

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Archives

2018-02-21 Syria

Royal gatecrasher! Queen Elizabeth attends London Fashion Week

IN THE WORLD PAPERS - Wednesday, February 21: There's anger, horror and disbelief from the press after the latest air strikes demolish the Syrian neighbourhood of Eastern Ghouta....

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2018-02-21 France

The secrets of Jean-Marie Le Pen: Far-right party founder publishes tell-all

IN THE FRENCH PAPERS - Wednesday, February 21: French lawmakers are set to discuss a contentious asylum and immigration bill that's divided even Emmanuel Macron's own party....

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2018-02-20 Justin Trudeau

Meet Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer: Angela Merkel's 'mini-me'

IN THE WORLD PAPERS - Tuesday, February 20: Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is on an official visit with his family to India, but finds himself embroiled in a controversy...

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2018-02-20 France

Major French student union rocked by sexual assault claims

IN THE FRENCH PAPERS - Tuesday, February 20: A sexual assault scandal rocks France's major student union as 16 women recount their experiences in Libération. Also, Le Parisien...

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2018-02-19 gun control

'Never again': Florida school students become new face of US gun reform

IN THE WORLD PAPERS - Monday, February 19: Florida students have been rallying for more gun control after last week's deadly school shooting. Some papers wonder: could this be...

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