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Tensions still high in Paris suburbs after police rape allegations

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ACCESS ASIA

Pakistan: Despite rights gains, transgender community still at risk

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THE DEBATE

Fillon, Le Pen cry 'witch-hunt' over corruption probes (part 1)

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BUSINESS DAILY

Fly me to the moon: SpaceX's plans for space tourism

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IN THE PAPERS

'We are Deniz'

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IN THE PAPERS

Fillon and Copé bury the hatchet over some cheese

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EYE ON AFRICA

Displaced people in Cameroon not getting enough aid

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MEDIAWATCH

Monumental mix up at Oscars

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THE DEBATE

Do scandals matter? Fillon, Le Pen cry 'witch-hunt" over corruption probes (part 2)

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IN THE PAPERS

An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. Brown

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Archives

2017-02-28 Syria

'We are Deniz'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Tues. 28.02.17: Arabic language papers focus on the latest UN-backed Syrian peace talks in Geneva. Many are pessimistic and say this fourth round is...

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2017-02-28 François Fillon

Fillon and Copé bury the hatchet over some cheese

FRENCH PAPERS - Tues. 28.02.17: With the presidential election less than two months away, conservative candidate François Fillon buries the hatchet with one of his former...

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2017-02-27 Oscars (Academy Awards)

White House silence over Kansas bar shooting angers India

IN THE WORLD PAPERS - Thursday, February 27: Politicised, anticlimactic and finally, inclusive, this year's Academy Awards ceremony was anything but ordinary. And in India,...

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2017-02-27 Oscars (Academy Awards)

Oscars: Not so white anymore, but very political

IN THE FRENCH PAPERS - Monday, February 27: There's a lot of focus on the ongoing legal headaches for two of the French presidential candidates: François Fillon and Marine le...

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2017-02-24 Syria

Xenophobic attacks in South Africa cause tension with Nigeria

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Fri. 24.02.17: Papers focus on the situation in Syria, where Turkish-backed troops have managed to recapture Al Bab, a major stronghold of the Islamic...

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