Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

Hiroshima's Healing Hug

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Uganda Terror Trial: Five jailed for life for 2010 Al-Shabaab World Cup Bombings

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Obama in Hiroshima and Austria's close call (part 1)

Read more

THE WORLD THIS WEEK

French labour strikes, raids on Google and McDonald's (part 2)

Read more

REPORTERS

Ukraine: Searching for missing people in Donbass

Read more

REVISITED

Video: What remains of the Gezi movement in Turkey?

Read more

FRANCE IN FOCUS

Euro 2016: France readies for kick off

Read more

ENCORE!

Anne A-R : The people beyond the numbers: A photographic manifesto from the migrant trail

Read more

ENCORE!

Video: Ken Loach wins his second Palme d'Or in Cannes

Read more

An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

IN THE PAPERS

IN THE PAPERS

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. Brown

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2016-05-27 France

Salon's message to Republicans: 'You are stuck with him now!'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Fri. 27.05.16: Papers around the world focus on the social unrest in France, US President Barack Obama's historic visit to Hiroshima, Donald Trump's more...

Read more

2016-05-27 labour law

'Time Out': Le Parisien calls for calm amid social unrest

FRENCH PAPERS - Fri. 27.05.16: Papers are still dominated by the continued social unrest against the government’s contested labour reform. Le Parisien calls for calm before...

Read more

2016-05-26 Israel

Netanyahu's coalition: 'Israel's dark hour'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Thursday, May 26: There are a lot of opinion pieces on Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's new coalition. Meanwhile, Amnesty International accuses...

Read more

2016-05-26 protest

French strikes: How far will the unions go?

FRENCH PAPERS - Thursday, May 26: "The fire is burning" or "France is blocked" - these are some of the headlines as strikes and protests against labour reforms enter their eight...

Read more

2016-05-25 Taliban

'The name's Bond, Jane Bond'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Weds. 25.05.16: Papers around the world focus on the Taliban. The Afghan group has named a new leader following the death of Mullah Akhtar Mohammad...

Read more