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BUSINESS DAILY

Bailout talks worry Greeks living under austerity

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THE INTERVIEW

NATO chief Stoltenberg: The US is 'strongly committed to NATO'

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IN THE PAPERS

'Thanks but no thanks': French left-wing candidates bury idea of alliance

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FRANCE IN FOCUS

Organic farming in France: Green is the new black

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EYE ON AFRICA

Nigeria: Suicide bombers die in failed attack with suspected Boko Haram links

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MEDIAWATCH

Are some of the right-wing media becoming hostile to Trump?

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THE WORLD THIS WEEK

The World According to Trump (part 1)

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THE WORLD THIS WEEK

Kim Jong-un, François Fillon, French Police Brutality (part 2)

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PEOPLE & PROFIT

Europe market jitters: Political risks give investors cause for concern

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IN THE PAPERS

An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. Brown

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2017-02-20 Benoit Hamon

'Thanks but no thanks': French left-wing candidates bury idea of alliance

IN THE FRENCH PAPERS - Monday, February 20: It's election fever in France and the candidates are hitting the campaign trail hard. But the left has definitively "buried" any hope...

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2017-02-17 Donald Trump

'Journalists Whisper at Trump's Crazy Press Conference: 'This Is Insane''

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Fri. 17.02.17: The Washington Post has fresh revelations in the Michael Flynn scandal. Papers also react to Donald Trump's "surreal" press conference and...

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2017-02-17 Emmanuel Macron

France's Macron causes uproar by calling colonisation 'crime against humanity'

FRENCH PAPERS - Fri. 17.02.17: Centrist presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron draws ire from conservatives after saying colonisation was a "crime against humanity". Meanwhile,...

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2017-02-16 Kim Jong-un

London Bankers' Booze Ban: No more day drinking in the City

IN THE WORLD PAPERS - Thursday, February 16: The South Korean press point the finger at North Korea after Kim Jong-Nam, the leader's half-brother, is poisoned to death in...

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2017-02-16 François Fillon

Sarkozy advises Fillon: 'Don't isolate yourself'

IN THE FRENCH PAPERS - Thursday, February 16: Papers focus on scandal-hit conservative presidential candidate François Fillon's lunch with Nicolas Sarkozy. Was Fillon trying to...

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