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MEDIAWATCH

Melania’s jacket: What did it mean?

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EYE ON AFRICA

South Sudan peace deal attempt fails as Kiir rejects Machar

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THE DEBATE

Zero Tolerance: Does Border Security Trump Compassion?

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FRANCE IN FOCUS

Let's become French!

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FOCUS

Taking sides: The dual-nationality footballers playing at the World Cup

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FASHION

Dior trots out Cruise collection at Chantilly stables

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YOU ARE HERE

France's Pelagos sanctuary, a haven for whales and dolphins

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#THE 51%

Developing a code of their own: Are women leading the tech revolution in Paris?

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#TECH 24

Motorsport innovation

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IN THE PRESS

An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

Latest update : 2012-07-03

Grim news and alarming psychoanalysis

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apologises...to Turkey for shooting down a fighter jet. Also, Human Rights Watch investigates Syian torture centres. And there’s speculation about criminal prosecution of the Barclays bankers who rigged interest rates. For one paper that would not be enough, given the distorting effects that unconstrained power has on the brain activity of those running a virtually unregulated banking industry.

Human Rights Watch has investigated two dozen torture centres across Syria, and The Brisbane Times highlights witness accounts in which we read of stapled chests and electric shocks.

In the UK, the Barclays bankers responsible for rigging inter-banking rates could be prosecuted for criminal behaviour. The Independent argued the Chairman’s head should not have rolled though, as interest rate manipulation would have been below his level of oversight. CEO Bob Diamond should be the one to go. (Someone was listening, as Diamond has since stepped down).

In an essay on The Psychology of Greed, the Guardian cites studies which look into the effects of power on the human brain. Bank bosses are more powerful than most elected officials – particularly after decades of deregulation, and holding onto power changes brains by boosting testosterone, which increases the dopamine in the brain's reward systems.

While moderate amounts encourage people to be more strategic and bolder, the logic goes, extreme forms distort personalities, making them egocentric, unempathetic and greedy for financial, sexual and material rewards.

All the while, the excess of unchecked power dulls their perception of risk, even when a storm is brewing.

By Kyle G. BROWN

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2018-06-22 Alison SARGENT

'I really don't care', do we? Melania Trump's coat chaos

Friday, June 22, 2018: The media is baffled by the US first lady's decision to wear a jacket emblazoned with the words "I REALLY DON'T CARE, DO U?" while travelling to a child...

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2018-06-21 Dheepthika LAURENT

Burger King pulls ad offering burgers for women impregnated by World Cup stars

IN THE PAPERS - Thursday, June 21: We look at searing reactions to Donald Trump's "about-face" on immigration after he signs an executive order ending migrant family separations....

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2018-06-20 Dheepthika LAURENT

Australian female comedian's murder sparks soul-searching about women's safety

IN THE PAPERS - Wednesday, June 20: We look at reactions from the papers after the US pulls out of the UN human rights body. Also, is Turkey suffering from Erdogan exhaustion?...

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2018-06-19 Dheepthika LAURENT

'The frozen heart of America': Condemnation as migrant families torn apart in US

IN THE PAPERS - Tuesday, June 19: There's outrage from both sides of the political spectrum over Donald Trump's migration policy that's seen children separated from their...

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2018-06-18 Dheepthika LAURENT

Celebrations after Mexico's win against Germany prompts 'fan-made' earthquake

IN THE PAPERS - Monday, June 18: We look at reactions in Colombia after the country elects conservative Ivan Duque as its new president. In the US, criticism grows from...

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