Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

FOCUS

Catalonia's pro-independence movement tempted by radicalisation

Read more

ENCORE!

Film show: 'May ’68', Director’s Fortnight reloaded, 'A Paris Education'

Read more

IN THE PRESS

Macron and Trump: Dandruff diplomacy?

Read more

PERSPECTIVE

Big data: ‘A key democratic issue’

Read more

MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Susan Meiselas: Kurdistan through the lens

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Global wine production drops to lowest level in 60 years

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Trump and Macron media moments in the US

Read more

ENCORE!

Photographer Clare Strand explores the causes and consequences of communication breakdown

Read more

IN THE PRESS

Fashion and ethics: Five years after Bangladesh factory collapse, what's changed?

Read more

REPORTERS

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2012-03-02

Dangerous 'krokodil' seducing Russian drug addicts

Russia is home to more than 2 million heroin users - more than anywhere else in the world. A cheaper and severely addictive morphine derivative called desomorphine, or krokodil, is widely available and becoming addicts' drug of choice. The name refers to the scaly appearance of krokodil users' skin, which often turns black or develops gangrenous sores. While Russian authorities remain silent, one group is determined to win this drug war. It uses a radical weapon: mandatory rehab for junkies.

For the past few months people in Moscow have been hearing about a new homemade drug, synthesized from codeine and known as "krokodil". This drug is 15 times as harmful as the real thing, and far more dangerous.

Even though some Russian media have done reports on the drug, hard facts about it remain scarce. Recently, some graphic videos have been uploaded to YouTube showing the terrible side effects the drug can have on its users.

We were in the city most affected by the krokodil epidemic: Ekaterinbourg, in the Urals. We first stopped at the local ”narcotic health center”, where addicts go to rest for a few days. 

By Xavier LUIZET , Ksenia BOLCHAKOVA

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2018-04-20 Africa

Africa’s donkeys slaughtered for Chinese ‘miracle elixir’

Every year, China slaughters millions of donkeys to make Ejiao, a traditional medicine hailed as a ‘miracle elixir’ which is used to treat various ailments. As China’s donkey...

Read more

2018-04-13 Americas

From Brazil to Canada: the new odyssey for African migrants

Canada has become the new El Dorado for many African migrants, who have seen Europe and the United States close their borders. But they face a dangerous journey across South and...

Read more

2018-04-06 Africa

Video: Mauritanian Sahara delights tourists again after years blighted by terror

After years blighted by terror attacks, tourists are beginning to return to Mauritania. Charter flights between Paris and the Mauritanian Sahara resumed in December 2017....

Read more

2018-03-30 Middle East

Video: Fighting for survival in war-torn Yemen

Since 2015, Yemen has been locked in a civil war in which Saudi Arabia – a supporter of Yemen’s President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi-- has led a Sunni coalition against Houthi...

Read more

2018-03-23 terrorism

Inside the Kurdish courts trying IS group militants

The long and gruesome war that the Kurds have waged against the Islamic State (IS) group has not only left thousands dead but also produced many prisoners. For the first time, a...

Read more