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An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time. And you can watch it online as early as Friday.

Latest update : 2012-03-09

Keeping the American dream alive

In the United States, owning your own home is part of the American dream. But for many, the dream has become a nightmare. Every month, tens of thousands of homeowners are losing their houses to foreclosure. But people are fighting back. Our reporters went to Florida, the state that has been most severely affected, where one group of people helps these victims of the crisis to hold on to the American dream.

Fourteen million Americans without a job, six and a half million foreclosures, and forty million people on food stamps. The figures detailing the economic crisis in the United States give one pause. We decided to meet the people behind these statistics. 

We discovered families who fight for months - sometimes even years – to avoid defaulting on their mortgages. This means no more evenings or dinners out, of course, but also no more money to spend on university studies or sometimes on healthcare, even in the case of a serious illness.
 
Saving a family home is about much more than just keeping one’s name on the title deed. Keeping an address means providing normal living conditions for one's children and having a chance to find a new job.

By Miyuki DROZ ARAMAKI , Ludovic Gaillard

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2017-03-16 Americas

Canada’s indigenous people determined to improve their lives

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2017-03-09 Middle East

Iraq's lost children: Victims of post-traumatic stress

In Iraq, thousands of civilians are fleeing the battle of Mosul against the Islamic State group jihadists. Many of the displaced have reached IDP camps in the north of the...

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2017-03-03 Africa

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Six years have passed since the outbreak of the revolution that led to the ouster and killing of Libyan strongman Muammar Gaddafi. With the country divided between rival clans,...

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2014-03-14 Bashar al-Assad

Syria’s chemical attacks: the inside story

A chemical weapons attack targeted the suburbs of Damascus in August 2013. The West threatened air strikes in response, and Syria agreed to destroy its chemical arms stockpile....

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2017-02-24 Middle East

Video: India’s Kuki people, possible descendants of one of Israel's lost tribes

In northeastern India, a small ethnic group claims to be one of the lost tribes of Israel. The fervour of the Kuki people has persuaded the Chief Rabbi of Israel to approve their...

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