Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE DEBATE

France's Burkini Ban: Identity politics go to the beach (part 1)

Read more

THE DEBATE

France's Burkini Ban: Identity politics go to the beach (part 2)

Read more

FOCUS

Chancellor Merkel's immigration policy faces test on her home turf

Read more

FRENCH CONNECTIONS

Understanding the burkini ban

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

US Treasury lashes out at EU tax probes

Read more

INSIDE THE AMERICAS

Olympic Hangover: festive mood dampened by gloomy economy

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

British professor says 'no shame' in reading romance novels

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Libération:'STOP hunting for burkinis!'

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Closing arguments presented in the ICC trial of the Malian Jihadist who destroyed shrines

Read more

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time. And you can watch it online as early as Friday.

REPORTERS

REPORTERS

Latest update : 2012-03-09

Keeping the American dream alive

In the United States, owning your own home is part of the American dream. But for many, the dream has become a nightmare. Every month, tens of thousands of homeowners are losing their houses to foreclosure. But people are fighting back. Our reporters went to Florida, the state that has been most severely affected, where one group of people helps these victims of the crisis to hold on to the American dream.

Fourteen million Americans without a job, six and a half million foreclosures, and forty million people on food stamps. The figures detailing the economic crisis in the United States give one pause. We decided to meet the people behind these statistics. 

We discovered families who fight for months - sometimes even years – to avoid defaulting on their mortgages. This means no more evenings or dinners out, of course, but also no more money to spend on university studies or sometimes on healthcare, even in the case of a serious illness.
 
Saving a family home is about much more than just keeping one’s name on the title deed. Keeping an address means providing normal living conditions for one's children and having a chance to find a new job.

By Miyuki DROZ ARAMAKI , Ludovic Gaillard

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2016-08-04 Afghanistan

Afghanistan's Kunduz, a city under Taliban threat

The northern Afghan city of Kunduz is being slowly rebuilt after it briefly fell to the Taliban last year, and a hospital was destroyed by US air strikes supporting Afghan ground...

Read more

2016-07-29 2016 Olympics

Video: Olympic refugee team goes for gold

Of all the athletes competing at the Olympics in Rio, there are ten in particular who stand out. They are all refugees who have fled war, terror and violence. Fleeing DR Congo,...

Read more

2016-07-08 history

Video: The trial of Chad's ex-dictator Habré, an inconvenient ally

In May, former Chadian president Hissène Habré, who ruled his country with an iron fist between 1982 and 1990, was sentenced to life in prison for "crimes against humanity,...

Read more

2016-07-01 agriculture

Video: FRANCE 24 speaks to French farmers in crisis

France is the EU's largest agricultural producer, but its farmers are faced with administrative constraints, falling sales prices and debt. Many are pushed into depression and...

Read more

2016-06-23 World War I

World War I: When northern France was on German time

During World War I, thirteen of France's regional departments were under German occupation. For four years, two million French citizens took their orders from Berlin. No more...

Read more