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Latest update : 2012-03-09

Keeping the American dream alive

In the United States, owning your own home is part of the American dream. But for many, the dream has become a nightmare. Every month, tens of thousands of homeowners are losing their houses to foreclosure. But people are fighting back. Our reporters went to Florida, the state that has been most severely affected, where one group of people helps these victims of the crisis to hold on to the American dream.

Fourteen million Americans without a job, six and a half million foreclosures, and forty million people on food stamps. The figures detailing the economic crisis in the United States give one pause. We decided to meet the people behind these statistics. 

We discovered families who fight for months - sometimes even years – to avoid defaulting on their mortgages. This means no more evenings or dinners out, of course, but also no more money to spend on university studies or sometimes on healthcare, even in the case of a serious illness.
 
Saving a family home is about much more than just keeping one’s name on the title deed. Keeping an address means providing normal living conditions for one's children and having a chance to find a new job.

By Miyuki DROZ ARAMAKI , Ludovic Gaillard

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Archives

2018-02-16 Africa

Video: Girls in Malawi victims of 'sexual cleansing' ritual

In the remote southern regions of Malawi, a violent tradition is practised on young women. Girls who reach puberty are forced to have sex with a "hyena", a man chosen by their...

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2018-02-09 China

Video: The victims of China’s forced disappearances

In China, the authorities go to great lengths to control civil society, even resorting to forced disappearances. Since President Xi Jinping came to power in 2013, political...

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2018-02-02 Europe

Video: Crossing the Alps with Guinean migrants on a perilous journey

Since last summer, more migrants have been trying to cross the frozen plains of the Col de l'Échelle mountain pass in the Alps in a bid to reach France from Italy. In 2016 only a...

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2018-01-26 France

Video: French Guiana battles with migrant influx, drug trafficking

In Saint-Laurent-du-Maroni, French Guiana's second-largest city, one in three residents is foreign and often there illegally. To reach this South American region of overseas...

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2018-01-19 Iraq

Exclusive: On the frontline with Shiite militias in Iraq

In December 2017, the Iraqi government announced with great fanfare the "official end of the war against the Islamic State group". The announcement marked the end of three years...

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