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Burundian top judge says he fled the country after government pressure

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EYE ON AFRICA

U.N. denies accusations it tried to cover sexual abuse in Central African Republic

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"Francois of Arabia" criticised in French press

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DEBATE

François of Arabia: Hollande's Budding Friendship with the Gulf (part 2)

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DEBATE

François of Arabia: Hollande's Budding Friendship with the Gulf (part 1)

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TALKING EUROPE

Guy Verhofstadt: Lack of EU asylum system is 'pushing people to come to Europe'

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The health risk behind Argentina's soya paradise

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Disability discrimination: Removing the obstacles to success

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Music show: Mumford & Sons and the 'Queen of British Blues'

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An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time.

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Latest update : 2012-03-09

Keeping the American dream alive

In the United States, owning your own home is part of the American dream. But for many, the dream has become a nightmare. Every month, tens of thousands of homeowners are losing their houses to foreclosure. But people are fighting back. Our reporters went to Florida, the state that has been most severely affected, where one group of people helps these victims of the crisis to hold on to the American dream.

Fourteen million Americans without a job, six and a half million foreclosures, and forty million people on food stamps. The figures detailing the economic crisis in the United States give one pause. We decided to meet the people behind these statistics. 

We discovered families who fight for months - sometimes even years – to avoid defaulting on their mortgages. This means no more evenings or dinners out, of course, but also no more money to spend on university studies or sometimes on healthcare, even in the case of a serious illness.
 
Saving a family home is about much more than just keeping one’s name on the title deed. Keeping an address means providing normal living conditions for one's children and having a chance to find a new job.

By Miyuki DROZ ARAMAKI , Ludovic Gaillard

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Archives

2015-04-30 Syria

Syria: On the trail of looted antiquities

As the war in Syria enters its fifth year, the trafficking of looted antiquities is adding a new dimension to the tragic conflict. Many Syrian artefacts are smuggled across the...

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2015-04-24 World War I

Saving French soldiers' WWI trench carvings

In 1914, a former underground quarry in Picardy in northern France is requisitioned by the French army. For almost four years, hundreds of soldiers were stationed there. Many...

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2015-04-17 Armenia

Turkey’s hidden Armenians search for stolen identity

In 1915, during World War I, the Ottoman Empire ordered the extermination of the Armenian people. One and a half million were killed in the first genocide of the 20th century....

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2015-04-10 Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso: Generation Sankara

Six months after the ouster of Blaise Compaoré, Burkina Faso is attempting to organise its first democratic elections, set for October. Fears of a coup still loom. But from...

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2015-04-03 Islam

Inside the French Islamic Organisation

Ever since the January terror attacks in Paris, debate has focussed on how well integrated France's Muslim community is. One organisation that has come under the spotlight in...

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