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Next stop, Westminster: Supreme Court orders Brexit parliament vote (part 1)

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Next stop, Westminster: Supreme Court orders Brexit parliament vote (part 2)

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Iranian women push boundaries through sport

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IN THE PAPERS

'Donald Trump is rolling back the clock on diversity in the cabinet'

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IN THE PAPERS

Did France's left inflate turnout figures in round one of the primary?

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Dozens killed in attack on military camp in Mali

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IN THE PAPERS

An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

Latest update : 2012-03-16

Swiss bus disaster: "why my child?"

Belgium "weeps for its children". The country is holding a National Day of Mourning for the victims of Tuesday's bus crash in Switzerland. And on Syria, we look at how the British papers are following up on The Guardian's publication of leaked Assad e-mails. That's the focus for the this press review, Friday 16th March 2012.

The Dutch-speaking Belgian paper Het Laatse Nieuws shows photos of some of the victims of Tuesday's bus crash in Switzerland along with one young mourner in tears as she holds a flower.

Another Dutch-speaking paper De Morgen fills its front page with a cartoon of an empty classroom.

Swiss paper Le Temps headlines that are no clues as yet as to what happened. While Le Matin reports the theory that the driver crashed after helping a teacher put on a DVD is being dismissed as “speculation”.

Following The Guardian's scoop this week publishing leaked Assad e-mails, the Guardian's cartoonist Steve Bell compares the Syrian President to the Harry Potter character Lord Voldemort.

The paper's comment writer Peter Beaumont says the danger for the Syrian opposition is that the e-mails only make Assad seem more human.

The Daily Telegraph has spoken to Assad’s father in law, Fawaz Akras, who lives in London and who compares the Syrian uprising to last summer’s riots in England.

And the cartoon in The Independent shows a tranquil Assad sending a text on his smart phone saying: “Let Them Tweet Cake”.

By Nicholas RUSHWORTH

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Archives

2017-01-24 Syria

'Donald Trump is rolling back the clock on diversity in the cabinet'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Tues. 24.01.17: Papers around the world focus on Syrian peace talks which kicked off in Astana, Kazakhstan on Monday. Opinions are divided about the...

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2017-01-24 left wing

Did France's left inflate turnout figures in round one of the primary?

FRENCH PAPERS - Tues. 24.01.17: Papers are still focusing on the first round of the left-wing primary that was held on Sunday. Doubts have been raised over the results: did the...

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2017-01-23 Syria

'Trump Administration Starts with Big Lie Over Small Thing'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Mon. 23.01.17: Papers around the world focus on Syrian peace talks kicking off in Kazakhstan. Stateside, papers wonder what Donald Trump achieved during...

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2017-01-23 left wing

French left-wing primary: The 'two lefts' go to war

The French papers focus on round one of the left-wing presidential primary which took place on Sunday. Benoit Hamon suprised many by finishing first, followed closely by former...

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2017-01-20 Gambia

'On Inauguration Day, respect for the office and hope for the nation'

INTERNATIONAL PAPERS - Fri. 20.01.17: The volatile situation in Gambia is in the spotlight today. But the real story dominating the press is the upcoming inauguration of Donald...

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