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Training future football champions in Vietnam

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Guitar Hero: Johnny Marr brings solo work to the stage in Paris

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THE INTERVIEW

Presidential meeting signals 'another chapter' in Franco-Rwandan relations

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Macron courts tech giants during Paris summit

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Trade truce: US-China tensions cool, but is a trade war still possible?

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BUSINESS DAILY

Viva Technology conference opens in Paris as Macron seeks French dominance

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IN THE PRESS

Does the NFL's new ultimatum on kneeling pander to Donald Trump?

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IN THE PRESS

What's in a name? France moves to protect regional term for chocolate croissant

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EYE ON AFRICA

Macron and Kagame meet to repair strained ties over Rwandan genocide

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IN THE PRESS

An overview of the stories making the French and international newspaper headlines. From Monday to Friday live at 7.20 am and 9.20 am Paris time.

Latest update : 2012-03-16

Swiss bus disaster: "why my child?"

Belgium "weeps for its children". The country is holding a National Day of Mourning for the victims of Tuesday's bus crash in Switzerland. And on Syria, we look at how the British papers are following up on The Guardian's publication of leaked Assad e-mails. That's the focus for the this press review, Friday 16th March 2012.

The Dutch-speaking Belgian paper Het Laatse Nieuws shows photos of some of the victims of Tuesday's bus crash in Switzerland along with one young mourner in tears as she holds a flower.

Another Dutch-speaking paper De Morgen fills its front page with a cartoon of an empty classroom.

Swiss paper Le Temps headlines that are no clues as yet as to what happened. While Le Matin reports the theory that the driver crashed after helping a teacher put on a DVD is being dismissed as “speculation”.

Following The Guardian's scoop this week publishing leaked Assad e-mails, the Guardian's cartoonist Steve Bell compares the Syrian President to the Harry Potter character Lord Voldemort.

The paper's comment writer Peter Beaumont says the danger for the Syrian opposition is that the e-mails only make Assad seem more human.

The Daily Telegraph has spoken to Assad’s father in law, Fawaz Akras, who lives in London and who compares the Syrian uprising to last summer’s riots in England.

And the cartoon in The Independent shows a tranquil Assad sending a text on his smart phone saying: “Let Them Tweet Cake”.

By Nicholas RUSHWORTH

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