Don't miss




Rwandan president given green light for third term

Read more


Sarkozy's son is an "absolute gun lover"

Read more


FIFA's House of Cards (part2)

Read more


FIFA's House of Cards (part1)

Read more


Oregon shooting: Gun culture in the United States

Read more


Canada's methods of Islamist deradicalization

Read more


Climate change: Who will pay for developing countries?

Read more


NYT: 'Is Vladimir Putin trying to teach the West a lesson in Syria?'

Read more


Britain and the EU: Should it stay or should it go?

Read more

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time.



Latest update : 2012-06-08

Ukraine: Who benefits from Euro 2012?

Ukraine has invested billions in hosting the Euro 2012 tournament. But faced with shady construction firms, contracts obtained without calls for tender and costly renovations, some are wondering where the money for Euro 2012 really went.

Ukraine has spent over 10 billion euros on preparations for Euro 2012, half of it taxpayers' money. But opposition groups, such as Ukrainska Pravda, denounce the lack of transparency in awarding contracts and insist that fraud has taken place. They claim, for example, that a contract was awarded to a construction company that is registered in Cyprus.... The government denies any corruption.

Besides, Ukrainians can see the elite's increasing wealth for themselves. The president owns a luxury home in Mezhyhyrya, outside Kiev. The general feeling is that Ukraine's entire political class - even former prime minister Yulia Tymoshenko, currently in jail - is corrupt.

Like many Ukrainians whom we met, the workers on the Kiev stadium are angry. They told us they had been paid pitifully little, or late, or not at all. Few of them agreed to speak on the record - for fear of being beaten up, or worse, they said.

But even as they rail against alleged corrupt spending on Euro 2012 preparations, angry Ukrainians and NGOs will no doubt still enjoy the tournament. For Ukraine, hosting such a prestigious sporting event is a huge deal. Some EU politicians may boycott Euro 2012, but Ukrainian football fans certainly won't. Whether that will lead the people to forgive the government its sins before October's elections, however, is another question.

By Gulliver CRAGG



2015-10-02 South Africa

Video: Farmers living in fear in South Africa

In South Africa, violence in the big cities like Pretoria, Johannesburg or Cape Town often makes the front pages of the newspapers, but crime that is terrorising countryside...

Read more

2015-09-24 Italy

Video: The children of Italy's 'Ndrangheta mafia

The 'Ndrangheta, or Calabrian mafia, is one of the most powerful criminal organisations in the world. Its annual turnover is estimated at tens of billions of euros. Nicknamed...

Read more

2015-09-18 migrants

Video: The journey to exile, from Greece to France

The migrant crisis is an issue set to plague Europe for years to come. FRANCE 24 dispatched Fernande van Tets, Karim Hakiki and Adel Gastel to cover the issue first hand, and...

Read more

2015-09-11 Algeria

Algeria's rugby pioneers seek international recognition

In Algeria, rugby is largely sidelined by the nation’s favourite sport: football. But thanks to the determination of a few avid players, Algeria has now formed a national rugby...

Read more

2015-09-04 Hungary

Video: Alongside migrants near Hungary’s razor wire fence

Every day, hundreds of migrants set off on the so-called Balkan route, one of the busiest irregular passages to Europe. Although longer, but less dangerous than that across the...

Read more