Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE OBSERVERS

Pollution threatens island paradise of Mauritius, and one Cameroonian expat's quest to bring safe drinking water to his country

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Publicis boss encourages firms to move staff to Paris post-Brexit

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

'Fake news has had almost no impact on Wikipedia'

Read more

FOCUS

Iraq: Embedded with French special forces in Mosul

Read more

ENCORE!

Dominique Dalcan: Godfather of French 90s pop returns to his roots

Read more

YOU ARE HERE

Ringing the bells of northern France

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

'Trump Administration Starts with Big Lie Over Small Thing'

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Samsung blames batteries for Galaxy Note 7 explosions

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

EU Transport Commissioner: 'We are preparing legislation on drones'

Read more

Europe

Belfast police attacked in third night of violence

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2012-09-05

A Northern Ireland police officer was injured on Tuesday night as clashes between Catholic republicans and loyalists from the Protestant community in north Belfast broke out for a third consecutive night.

AFP - Rioters threw fireworks and other missiles at Northern Ireland police during the third night of sectarian disorder in north Belfast on Tuesday, police said.

One officer sustained a hand injury and a water cannon was moved into the Denmark Street area, although not used, as a group of around 200 people gathered at 10:00 pm (21:00 GMT).

The disturbance lasted about an hour, marking an easing in hostilities which erupted on Sunday when loyalists from the Protestant community attempted to disrupt a march by Catholic republicans.

Rioting on Sunday and Monday left more than 60 police officers injured, prompting police to fire baton rounds and use water cannons.

On all three nights, loyalists and republicans gathered in the Carlisle Circus area in the north of the city and pelted police with stones and fireworks as they tried to keep the two groups apart.

The chairman of the Northern Ireland Police Federation, Terry Spence, praised the "bravery and courage" of the frontline officers, saying it was "in stark contrast to that of the cowardly thugs responsible for trying to murder them".

Around 3,500 people died in the three decades of sectarian violence between Northern Ireland's Catholics and Protestants that largely ended with a 1998 peace agreement, though sporadic unrest and bomb threats continue.

Date created : 2012-09-05

  • UK

    Queen in landmark handshake with ex-IRA chief

    Read more

  • UK

    Queen begins landmark tour of Northern Ireland

    Read more

  • IRELAND

    Queen honours independence fighters on historic Irish visit

    Read more

COMMENT(S)