Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

A thin line between fact-checking and propaganda in Gaza social media coverage

Read more

DEBATE

Gaza: How to Stop the Spiral? Israel Readies For Ground Offensive (part 2)

Read more

DEBATE

Gaza: How to Stop the Spiral? Israel Readies For Ground Offensive

Read more

FOCUS

Ireland's missing babies casting light on a dark history...

Read more

WEB NEWS

World Cup 2014: Germany-Brazil inspires the Web

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Boutros-Ghali: 'I wanted to reform the UN'

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

57 000 little problems

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

The Sarkozy 'threat'

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Budget challenge for India's new government

Read more

  • Hamas rockets reaching deeper into Israel

    Read more

  • French companies will have to accept anonymous CVs

    Read more

  • Ukrainian forces close in on Donetsk

    Read more

  • Germany asks US intelligence station chief to leave country

    Read more

  • Death toll rises in Gaza as militants target Israeli cities

    Read more

  • UN chief Ban Ki-moon appoints new Syria mediator

    Read more

  • Video: Muslims in China confront obstacles to Ramadan fasting

    Read more

  • Tour de France passes WWI Chemin des Dames battlefield

    Read more

  • Senegalese man awarded French visa in gay marriage debate

    Read more

  • Israel steps up airstrikes as diplomacy gets under way

    Read more

  • Argentina beat Netherlands on penalties to reach World Cup final

    Read more

  • Foiled French jihadist ‘targeted Louvre and Eiffel Tower’

    Read more

  • Obama in Texas to urge congressional action on child migrant crisis

    Read more

  • Iraq’s heritage 'in danger' from ISIS militants

    Read more

  • 100 years on, the Tour de France returns to the Western Front

    Read more

Africa

DR Congo's Ntaganda in custody at The Hague

©

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2013-03-23

Rebel leader Bosco Ntaganda of the Democratic Republic of Congo will spend his first full day in the custody of the International Criminal Court in The Hague on Saturday, where he is to face charges of war crimes.

Congolese war crimes suspect Bosco Ntaganda spent his first night in custody at the International Criminal Court Saturday, having turned himself in to face charges ranging from murder and rape to using child soldiers.

 

The first ever suspect to voluntarily surrender to the ICC, Ntaganda is wanted for war crimes and crimes against humanity allegedly committed during his years as a warlord in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

The man known as “The Terminator” walked into the US embassy in Rwanda on Monday and asked to be sent to the Hague-based court.

Ntaganda was allegedly involved in the murder of at least 800 people in villages in the volatile east of the DR Congo. He is also accused of having kept child soldiers in his rebel army and using women as sex slaves between September 2002 and September 2003.

He was taken into ICC custody in Kigali and flown to Rotterdam airport late on Friday.

The ICC tweeted shortly after that “Bosco Ntaganda arrived to the ICC detention centre”, under Dutch police escort in The Hague’s seaside suburb of Scheveningen.

Ntaganda, born in 1973, will become the fifth African in the ICC’s custody. He will face judges for the first time on Tuesday at 1000 GMT, after a medical checkup.

Judges will verify his identity and the language in which he will be able to follow the hearings. In the presence of a defence lawyer, he will also be informed of the charges against him, the court said.

ICC prosecutor Fatou Bensouda welcomed news of Ntaganda’s transfer, saying: “This is a good day for victims in the DRC and for international justice.

“Today those who are alleged to have long suffered at the hands of Bosco Ntaganda can look forward to the prospect of justice taking its course,” she said in a statement.

US Secretary of State John Kerry hailed a major step for “justice and accountability.”

“Now there is hope that justice will be done,” he said in a statement.


Ntaganda’s arrival in The Hague “will also send a strong message to all perpetrators of atrocities that they will be held accountable for their crimes,” Kerry said.

European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton also welcomed his surrender.

“Mr Ntaganda’s transfer to the ICC in preparation for a fair and credible trial at the Court sends a strong message to others accused of atrocities that they too will face justice one day,” she said in a statement.

Set up just over a decade ago, the ICC is the world’s only permanent criminal court to try genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.

Geraldine Mattioli-Zeltner of Human Rights Watch said Ntaganda’s arrival at the ICC “will be a major victory for victims of atrocities in eastern Congo and the local activists who have worked at great risk for his arrest.”

The expected trial will show the ICC’s importance in “providing accountability for the world’s worst crimes when national courts are unable or unwilling to deliver justice,” she added.

Once a commander of the Democratic Republic of Congo’s M23 rebels, Ntaganda is believed to have crossed into Rwanda at the weekend along with several hundred fighters loyal to him after they suffered a humiliating defeat at the hands of a rival rebel faction.

He arrived in the Netherlands almost four years after the signing of a March 23, 2009, peace agreement with Kinshasa that integrated his earlier rebel group into the regular army and paved the way for him to become a Congolese general.

The failure of that deal sparked a mutiny by the rebels-turned-soldiers, who set up the M23.

The rebels have been fighting the Congolese army in the restive and mineral-rich North Kivu province since April.

DR Congo and United Nations investigators have both accused Rwanda of backing the M23, a claim Kigali has always denied.

Analysts said Ntaganda’s transfer for trial would not have a major impact on peace efforts for eastern DR Congo.

“Bosco’s arrest won’t bring peace to the eastern Congo, but Bosco’s arrest does spell a victory in the battle against impunity and the dismantling of one of the barriers to a peace process in the country,” said Jason Stearns, author of several books on the region.

(AFP)

 

Date created : 2013-03-22

  • DR CONGO

    Congo rebel surrenders at US embassy in Rwanda

    Read more

  • DR CONGO

    African leaders sign peace deal for eastern DR Congo

    Read more

  • DR CONGO

    ICC acquits Congo militia boss of war crimes

    Read more

Comments

COMMENT(S)