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Tunisian topless activist feared missing is safe

© AFP

Text by FRANCE 24

Latest update : 2013-03-26

A Tunisian activist who was feared missing after posting topless photos of herself is safe and sound at home, her lawer said on Monday. Rumours of her disappearance had prompted a vast online solidarity campaign.

A Tunisian activist who was feared missing after posting topless photos of herself is at home and is safe and sound, her lawer said Monday.

“I spoke to her yesterday, Amina told me she was doing well and would be going back to school soon, her lawyer, Bochra Belhaj Hmida, told AFP.

The young woman, who identified herself as Amina Tyler, had caused controversy after posting photos of feminist slogans written across her naked chest, Femen-style, two weeks ago, in order to raise awareness of the deteriorating situation of women’s rights in Tunisia.

Then when the French branch of the feminist group said that they had not heard from her in several days, rumours that she had disappeared started swirling around the Web. A solidarity movement even launched itself, with dozens of women posting photos of themselves with “Free Amina” written across their own bare chests.

The Ukrainian feminist group Femen, known since 2010 for its topless actions meant to denounce sexism, has spawned local groups in several countries, including France.

Since the 1950s, Tunisian women have enjoyed more rights than in other Arab countries, including the right to file for divorce. But militants are worried that the ruling Islamist Ennahda party is trying to chip away at their freedom.

(FRANCE 24 with wires)
 

Date created : 2013-03-26

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