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LATEST SHOWS

MEDIAWATCH

Bayrou decides to march with Macron

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THE DEBATE

France's Topsy-Turvy Election: Uncertain outcome as insurgents blow away old guard (part 1)

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THE DEBATE

France's Topsy-Turvy Election: Uncertain outcome as insurgents blow away old guard (part 2)

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THE INTERVIEW

Amnesty chief urges France to 'stay true to its values'

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ENCORE!

Film show: 'Certain Women', 'Rock’n Roll' and 'A Wedding'

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FOCUS

#BringBackOurInternet: English-speaking Cameroon hit by digital blackout

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MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

Preaching coexistence: Avant-garde mosque opens in Lebanon's Druze heartland

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THE OBSERVERS

Prison guards turn guns on prisoners in Chile, and thousands of migrants stuck in smoky warehouses in Serbia

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FACE-OFF

French presidential race: Le Pen makes groundbreaking visit to Lebanon

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REVISITED

We return to places which have been in the news - often a long time ago, sometimes recently - to see how local people are rebuilding their lives. Sunday at 9.10 pm. And you can watch it online as early as Friday.

Latest update : 2013-04-24

Return to Fukushima, two years on

Two years after the nuclear disaster, Fukushima is still a ghost town. Our reporters went to meet the men and women whose lives were torn apart on March 11, 2011.

Yoshiharu Sue, 61, is one of 160,000 people evacuated from the area near the Fukushima nuclear plant after the accident triggered by the earthquake and tsunami. The disaster of March 11, 2011 cost the lives of almost 19,000 people in Japan.

A former engineer-turned-farmer, Sue had to leave his home after the disaster. “I saw a purple cloud, I thought it was best to run,” he told us. Sue also left behind his fields and the cemetery where his ancestors are buried. Like thousands of other nuclear refugees, he is now living in a dull, prefabricated housing unit. He shares just 50 square metres with his wife and mother.

Yet with his smile and pleasant manner, he showed us a brighter side to Fukushima. He is not the only one: there are grandmothers who meet up every afternoon to fold origami paper or play games, as well as volunteers who organise concerts and workshops. All of these people are trying to rebuild their lives, far from home.

By Guillaume BRESSION , Marie LINTON

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