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Twitter storm as IMF boss Christine Lagarde hails Saudi King Abdullah as 'strong advocate of women'

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DR CONGO: Senate amends controversial constitutional law

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Pope Family Planning: Heated Debate over Pontiff's 'Rabbit' Comments (part 2)

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Saudi King Abdullah Dies: Succession, Stability and Youth in Question (part 1)

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France tackles terror

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Jean-Pascal Tricoire, CEO of Schneider Electric: 'France is on a better track'

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Davos debate: Can big business agree on climate deal? (part 2)

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#THE 51%

Chile's abortion debate

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A show about human spirit and achievement in the face of adversity. We return to places which have been in the news - often a long time ago, sometimes recently - to see how local people are rebuilding their lives. Every other Sunday at 8.40 pm.

REVISITED

REVISITED

Latest update : 2013-04-24

Return to Fukushima, two years on

Two years after the nuclear disaster, Fukushima is still a ghost town. Our reporters went to meet the men and women whose lives were torn apart on March 11, 2011.

Yoshiharu Sue, 61, is one of 160,000 people evacuated from the area near the Fukushima nuclear plant after the accident triggered by the earthquake and tsunami. The disaster of March 11, 2011 cost the lives of almost 19,000 people in Japan.

A former engineer-turned-farmer, Sue had to leave his home after the disaster. “I saw a purple cloud, I thought it was best to run,” he told us. Sue also left behind his fields and the cemetery where his ancestors are buried. Like thousands of other nuclear refugees, he is now living in a dull, prefabricated housing unit. He shares just 50 square metres with his wife and mother.

Yet with his smile and pleasant manner, he showed us a brighter side to Fukushima. He is not the only one: there are grandmothers who meet up every afternoon to fold origami paper or play games, as well as volunteers who organise concerts and workshops. All of these people are trying to rebuild their lives, far from home.

By Guillaume BRESSION , Marie LINTON

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