Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

EYE ON AFRICA

Kenya’s opposition files a petition against presidential vote

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

'Siempre vida Barcelona'

Read more

THE DEBATE

Spain attacks - Can Europe prepare for vehicle-ramming terror attacks?

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Measures in place to prevent Grace Mugabe leaving South Africa

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Terror in Barcelona

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Terror attack, Trump turmoil rattle stock markets

Read more

FRENCH CONNECTIONS

Malbouffe: understanding junk food à la française

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Lebanon repeals 'rape law', but activists say more is needed to protect women

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

US business leaders abandon Trump after Charlottesville

Read more

DOWN TO EARTH

We meet the people behind fascinating environmental, health and technological innovations in a bid for sustainable solutions to our changing world. Saturday at 7.20 pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2013-05-27

Ethiopia: Planting hope in trees

In the past half century, Ethiopia has ravaged more than 90 percent of its forests. Reforestation campaigns are now sowing new hope on the Ethiopian highlands. France 24 went out to Ethiopia to find out more.

For every tree that is planted in Ethiopia, dozens of others are cut down. The result is an arid landscape, prone to erosion and incapable of growing essential crops.

This week we head to Tigray, close to the border with Eritrea, where the situation is particularly dire. Tigray has recovered from the famine that devastated the region in the 1980s, but the threat of hunger is never far away. Today the locals have begun to realise that replanting trees is one of the keys to their survival. International organisations Green Ethiopia and the Yves Rocher Foundation have stepped in to help.

While 20 million trees have been planted here in the past 12 years, efforts have been jepoardised by a much more powerful enemy: the eucalypt. This species was imported from Australia more than a century ago. It's loved by the locals because it grows quickly, but for the native species it's a vampire tree that greedily sucks up all the water resources. Concerned biologists are urging Ethiopians to respect and nurture the local trees in a bid to preserve biodiversity here and across the Horn of Africa.

By Mairead DUNDAS , Marina BERTSCH

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2017-06-20 Antarctica

Who benefits when the ice caps melt?

The Arctic and Antarctica are warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet, with the amount of sea ice lost equal to the size of Mexico (when we compare what we have today to...

Read more

2017-06-09 Mars

Could Mars be our Planet B?

As humans continue to ravage Earth, is it time to consider other planets as an alternative home? NASA and a host of private organisations - including Elon Musk's SpaceX - are in...

Read more

2017-05-26 Donald Trump

Trump has already quit the Paris climate deal - just not publicly

It doesn't really matter whether US President Donald Trump pulls his country out of the world's first binding agreement on climate change. All of his actions since taking office...

Read more

2017-05-09 France

Imagining a world without pesticides

After being used for decades by modern intensive agriculture, pesticides are now showing their limits. In southern Africa, a kind of pesticide-resistant caterpillar is destroying...

Read more

2017-04-24 tourism

How green is ecotourism?

In the past few decades, ecotourism has become increasingly popular but still represents only a fraction of the tourist industry: just 5%, according to the UN. For many nature...

Read more