Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

THE DEBATE

Has Merkel still got it ?

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Top Turkish official warns US forces could end up staying in Syria

Read more

ENCORE!

Music show: Paradisia, Björk & Robbie Williams

Read more

FOCUS

From ecological disaster to small miracle in Mauritania

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

Ukraine's deputy PM on Kiev's EU ambitions, corruption and Russian influence

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

A journalist murdered: Europe's media freedom under threat

Read more

THE INTERVIEW

Top psychiatrist: Trump's 'mental impairment' poses danger to world

Read more

BUSINESS DAILY

Hammond teases UK budget with homebuilding, driverless cars

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

The 'Blame Game' has begun in Germany

Read more

DOWN TO EARTH

We meet the people behind fascinating environmental, health and technological innovations in a bid for sustainable solutions to our changing world. Saturday at 7.20 pm. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2013-05-27

Ethiopia: Planting hope in trees

In the past half century, Ethiopia has ravaged more than 90 percent of its forests. Reforestation campaigns are now sowing new hope on the Ethiopian highlands. France 24 went out to Ethiopia to find out more.

For every tree that is planted in Ethiopia, dozens of others are cut down. The result is an arid landscape, prone to erosion and incapable of growing essential crops.

This week we head to Tigray, close to the border with Eritrea, where the situation is particularly dire. Tigray has recovered from the famine that devastated the region in the 1980s, but the threat of hunger is never far away. Today the locals have begun to realise that replanting trees is one of the keys to their survival. International organisations Green Ethiopia and the Yves Rocher Foundation have stepped in to help.

While 20 million trees have been planted here in the past 12 years, efforts have been jepoardised by a much more powerful enemy: the eucalypt. This species was imported from Australia more than a century ago. It's loved by the locals because it grows quickly, but for the native species it's a vampire tree that greedily sucks up all the water resources. Concerned biologists are urging Ethiopians to respect and nurture the local trees in a bid to preserve biodiversity here and across the Horn of Africa.

By Mairead DUNDAS , Marina BERTSCH

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2017-11-17 Fishing

The tiny parasite threatening your salmon sushi

Marine parasites known as sea lice are threatening the world's salmon supply. Today we eat three times more of the high-protein fish than in the 1980s, but the proliferation of...

Read more

2017-11-02 nuclear power

A nuclear waste dump for eternity

France has found a €25 billion solution to the unanswerable question of what to do with its high-level nuclear waste - bury it deep underground.

Read more

2017-10-19 China

Is China exporting its pollution?

China may be the world's champion of renewable energy, but its actions abroad are not always in line with a country truly committed to fighting climate change. With the United...

Read more

2017-10-06 terrorism

Is a bioterrorist attack possible?

The threat of a biological terrorist attack is now longer merely science fiction. From anthrax to smallpox and Ebola, scientists worry terrorists could turn biological agents...

Read more

2017-09-19 Brazil

Amazon rainforest pays heavy price for Brazil's political crisis

After promising signs that Brazil's Amazon was recovering from a devastating period of deforestation, alarm bells have been set off again. The number of hectares of felled forest...

Read more