Open

Coming up

Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

BUSINESS DAILY

Hollande's industrial policy under scrutiny during Florange visit

Read more

FOCUS

The growing frustration of Tunisia's jobless graduates

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

Monica Macovei, Former Romanian justice minister

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

Luxleaks: Will Europe crack down on tax evasion?

Read more

TALKING EUROPE

Dacian Ciolos, EU Commissioner for Agriculture and Rural Development

Read more

ENCORE!

Music Show: Beyoncé, David Guetta, Eminem and Iggy Azalea

Read more

#THE 51%

Ending violence against women: The dangers of trial by Twitter

Read more

THE OBSERVERS

Violent repression in Bahrain and Rio favelas that regret gang rule

Read more

ENCORE!

Michel Hazanavicius on life after 'The Artist'

Read more

Culture

British satirical novelist Tom Sharpe dies at 85

© AFP

Text by News Wires

Latest update : 2013-06-06

British writer Tom Sharpe has died in Spain at 85 from complications linked to diabetes, his publisher said Thursday. Several of his satirical novels were set in the academic and literary worlds, including the “Wilt” series and “The Great Pursuit”.

British writer Tom Sharpe, author of the dark-humoured "Wilt" series about a harassed literature teacher, died Thursday at the age of 85 in northeastern Spain, his publisher said.

"He died this morning of complications of the diabetes he had," said a source at his Spanish publisher, Anagrama, who asked not to be identified.

Sharpe, who wrote 16 best-selling novels, died in the coastal town of Llafranc, Catalonia, where he had lived since the late 1980s, the source said.

He divided his time between Spain and Cambridge, England, according to his US publisher Random House.

Considered by many fans as Britain's funniest writer, Sharpe created the anti-hero Henry Wilt, a polytechnic lecturer in literature frustrated by his home life, his students and the labyrinthine academic rivalries he faced at work.

Six novels chronicling Wilt's riotous life, in which he plots to murder his wife, struggles with international terrorism and finds himself suspected of drug trafficking, drew a huge audience.

Sharpe was educated at Lancing College and Pembroke College in Cambridge and moved to South Africa in 1951 after serving with the Marines.

Many critics consider his first two books, Riotous Assembly and Indecent Exposure, to be among his finest, both lampooning society in South Africa.

Two top sellers were made into television series: Porterhouse Blue, about the academically mediocre Porterhouse College, and Blott on the Landscape, which recounts the fight of a gardner, Blott, to prevent a motorway being laid though picturesque rural England.

Sharpe, who was married, was a history lecturer at the Cambridge College of Arts and Technology from 1963 to 1972.

He was awarded the 13th Grand Prix de l'Humour Noir Xavier Forneret in 1986 and the inaugural BBK La Risa de Bilbao Prize in 2010.

(AFP)

Date created : 2013-06-06

  • FRANCE-UK

    British poet anointed to guard French language

    Read more

  • LITERATURE

    US writer Julie Otsuka wins Femina foreign novel prize

    Read more

  • OBITUARY

    Gore Vidal, celebrated author, playwright, dies at 86

    Read more

COMMENT(S)