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Bolivia third country to offer Snowden asylum

© AFP file photo

Text by FRANCE 24

Latest update : 2013-07-06

Bolivia on Saturday joined its allies Venezuela and Nicaragua in offering to grant asylum to US intelligence leaker Edward Snowden. The fugitive who has been in legal limbo at Moscow airport since June 23.

NSA leaker Edward Snowden has yet another place to go, if only he can get there.

Bolivian President Evo Morales says Snowden is welcome in his country. He said Saturday he is making the offer as a protest against the U.S. and European nations he accuses of temporarily blocking his flight home from a Moscow summit because they suspected it might have Snowden on board.

Morales follows Presidents Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela and Daniel Ortega in making the offer. He’d earlier said he was willing to consider asylum for Snowden, the same position taken by Ecuador, which is another of Bolivia’s leftist Latin American allies.

Morales did not say if he has received a formal petition for asylum from Snowden.

The presidents of Nicaragua and Venezuela made their offers during during separate speeches in their home countries on Friday, one day after leftist South American leaders gathered to denounce the rerouting of Bolivian President Evo Morales’ plane over Europe amid reports that the American was aboard.

Snowden, who is being sought by the United States, has asked for asylum in numerous countries, including Nicaragua and Venezuela.

Venezuela’s Maduro made the offer during a speech marking the anniversary of Venezuela’s independence. It was not immediately clear if there were any conditions to the offer.

Nicaragua’s Ortega said he was willing to make Maduro’s same offer “if circumstances allow it,” although he didn’t say what the right circumstances would be when he spoke during a speech in Managua.

He said the Nicaraguan embassy in Moscow received Snowden’s application for asylum and that it is studying the request.

“We have the sovereign right to help a person who felt remorse after finding out how the United States was using technology to spy on the whole world, and especially its European allies,” Ortega said.

 

The offers came one day after Maduro joined other leftist South American presidents Thursday in Cochabamba, Bolivia, to rally behind Morales and denounce the incident involving the plane.

Spain on Friday said it had been warned along with other European countries that Snowden, a former U.S. intelligence worker, was aboard the Bolivian presidential plane, an acknowledgement that the manhunt for the fugitive leaker had something to do with the plane’s unexpected diversion to Austria.

It is unclear whether the United States warned Madrid about the Bolivian president’s plane. U.S. officials will not detail their conversations with European countries, except to say that they have stated the U.S.’s general position that it wants Snowden back.

President Barack Obama has publicly displayed a relaxed attitude toward Snowden’s movements, saying last month that he wouldn’t be “scrambling jets to get a 29-year-old hacker.”

But the drama surrounding the flight of Morales, whose plane was abruptly rerouted to Vienna after apparently being denied permission to fly over France, suggests that pressure is being applied behind the scenes.

Spanish Foreign Minister Jose Manuel Garcia-Margallo told Spanish National Television that “they told us that the information was clear, that he was inside.”

He did not identify who “they” were and declined to say whether he had been in contact with the U.S. But he said that European countries’ decisions were based on the tip.

France has since sent a letter of apology to the Bolivian government.

Meanwhile, secret-spilling website WikiLeaks said that Snowden, who is still believed to be stuck in a Moscow airport’s transit area, had put in asylum applications to six new countries. He had already sought asylum from more than 20 countries. Many have turned him down.

(FRANCE 24 with wires)
 

Date created : 2013-07-06

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