Don't miss

Replay


LATEST SHOWS

IN THE PAPERS

Party polizei: German cops expelled for pre-G20 summit debauchery

Read more

IN THE PAPERS

Power Play? Emmanuel Macron one-ups his PM, Edouard Philippe

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

South African court bars schools from promoting one religion over another

Read more

THE DEBATE

Wannacry more: How vulnerable are we to cyberattacks?

Read more

MEDIAWATCH

Time to remove fake Trump 'Time' covers from display!

Read more

FOCUS

Spain struggles to tackle violence against women

Read more

MIDDLE EAST MATTERS

How drones are transforming the battleground in Syria

Read more

ENCORE!

Film show: The Netflix debate, 'Faces Places' and 'Marnie'

Read more

EYE ON AFRICA

Over 8,000 migrants rescued from Mediterranean in 48 hours

Read more

REPORTERS

An in-depth report by our senior reporters and team of correspondents from around the world. Every Saturday at 9.10 pm Paris time. Or you can catch it online from Friday.

Latest update : 2013-09-27

Exclusive report: Central African Republic descends into chaos

Left to the mercy of armed groups who terrorise the population, the Central African Republic is descending into violence while its new government looks on hopelessly. Our reporters, Etienne Huver and Boris Heger, travelled to Bossangoa in the country’s northwest where the Muslim Séléka rebels have fatally clashed with mainly Christian vigilante groups.

We accompanied the first UN convoy to go to Bossangoa, a town in the northwest of the Central African Republic. Bossangoa is cut off from the world, with no electricity or phone lines. This is where the conflict has been the deadliest.

On our journey north, we travelled through dozens of villages that had been completely deserted. In one of them, at least six civilians had been killed.

When we arrived in Bossangoa, we discovered a town divided into Muslim and Christian communities. The various armed groups that clash in the countryside do not hesitate to attack civilians from all sides. The situation is extremely tense and can escalate at any moment.

Only the presence of African soldiers ensures basic security. One hundred and fifty soldiers are deployed in the town and are trying to keep the peace between the different communities.

But the humanitarian situation is of increasing concern. For over two weeks, several thousand people have been living clustered around the bishop's palace in appalling sanitary conditions. There is a shortage of food and medicine. NGOs have considerable difficulty in reaching the area due to the increasingly dangerous security situation.

Watch our debate "Chaos in the Central African Republic " by clicking here.

By Etienne Huver , Boris Heger

COMMENT(S)

Archives

2017-06-23 Culture

The birth of a film industry: Hollywood and World War I

As we mark the centenary of the United States entering World War I, FRANCE 24 brings you a documentary on the birth of Hollywood. Our journalist Florence Gaillard sheds new light...

Read more

2013-04-26 Bashar al-Assad

Syria: Aleppo’s tales of war

Two years into the revolution, Aleppo’s resistance shows no sign of letting up. France 24 brings you a portrait of the rebels who refuse to abandon their city to Bashar al-Assad....

Read more

2017-06-16 Europe

Modern-day slaves: Europe's fruit pickers

Every year in southern Europe, five million tonnes of fruit and vegetables are harvested for supermarket shelves. But those supermarkets are seeking ever lower prices, and are...

Read more

2017-06-08 Asia-pacific

Video: Millions of single Chinese men desperately seeking a wife

In China, the one-child policy has wreaked havoc. By encouraging the birth of boys rather than girls, an imbalance of the sexes has emerged. China now counts far more men than...

Read more

2017-06-01 Americas

Exclusive: The war for Brazil’s superhighway of drugs

Manaus, the capital of Brazil’s northern Amazonas state, has increasingly become the scene of violent confrontations between gangs. Located near the Colombian border, the city...

Read more